The One Hundred Eighty-Second Concert

Friday, August 25, 2017, 7:00 p.m.

Featuring:

Mark Furth, violin and viola

Julia Goudimova, cello

Gwyn Jones, flute

Tom Debevoise, guitar

David Ehrlich, piano

About the Program:

THE SOUTHWEST CHAMBER PLAYERS will return to Saint Augustine’s Church on Friday, August 25 for their second performance since the reopening of the magnificent new building. The concert will begin at 7:00 sharp, and be followed by a light reception. Admission is free, although donations are welcome. The program will include Schubert’s Arpeggione Sonata, together with works of Weber, Mozart, and Schumann.


The One Hundred Eighty-First Concert

Friday, March 31, 2017, 7:00 p.m.

Featuring:

Marje Palmieri, soprano

Julia Goudimova, cello

Winston Davis and Mark Furth, violins

Mary Norris, flute

Harold Yaffe, clarinet

Dilyana Kirova, bassoon

Stephen Brown and David Ehrlich, piano


About the Program:

THE SOUTHWEST CHAMBER PLAYERS are pleased to announce our triumphant return to the concert stage after a two-year hiatus caused by the demolition and subsequent rebuilding of our performance venue Saint Augustine’s Episcopal Church, 555 Water Street SW. The approximately two-hour show is scheduled for FRIDAY, MARCH 31, beginning at 7:00 sharp.

Part of the annual National Cherry Blossom Festival, the gala FREE performance will mark the twentieth anniversary of the group’s 1997 founding, and will represent SWCP’s 181st treading of the concert boards. Devoted to presenting the best of classical chamber music from the eighteenth to the twenty-first centuries, our program will consist of works of Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, Mendelssohn, Brahms, and others.

Featured Artist:

Julia Goudimova was born in Moscow. She began studying piano at the age of five and cello at the age of seven. After nine years of music school she studied at Tiraspol College of Music with Prof. G. A. Balykbaev. Julia received her master’s degree from Belarus Academy of Music under the instruction of E. L. Ksaveriev, professor of cello, who was a student of M. Rostropovich and N. Gutman. She has performed in recitals and chamber music concerts in Belarus, Moldova, Germany, South Korea, Bahrain and Saudi Arabia. Since moving to the United States, Julia has been actively participating in the music life of western Virginia and is involved in symphony and chamber performances in Lexington, Roanoke, Lynchburg, and Buena Vista, as well as Bath and Rockbridge Counties. Currently Julia is principal cellist of the University-Shenandoah Symphony Orchestra and a cello instructor at Washington and Lee and Southern Virginia universities.


The One Hundred Seventy-Ninth Concert

Friday, April 18, 2014, 12:00 p.m.

Featuring:

Joyce Bouvier and Marje Palmieri, sopranos

Dilyana Kirova, bassoon

David Ehrlich, piano

The Program:

Pergolesi (1710-36): Stabat Mater Dolorosa


The One Hundred Seventy-Eighth Concert

Thursday, March 27, 2014, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Monika Chamasayan-Dorosheff, violin; John Kaboff, cello

Gwyn Jones, flute; Jeff Kahan, oboe; Alisha Coleman, clarinet; Eric Hall, bassoon; Wendy Chinn, horn

Rosanne Conway and David Ehrlich, piano

The Program:

Bach: Sixth Cello Suite

Handel/Halvorson: Passacaglia

Poulenc: Sextet for Winds and Piano


The One Hundred Seventy-Seventh Concert

Friday, February 28, 2014, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Willem van Eeghen, violin; Caroline Brethauer, viola

Michael Stein, cello; Michael Rohrer, bass

Karen Judkins and Mary Norris, flute

Angela Murakami and Jerry Schwarz, clarinet

Dilyana Kirova and Robin Gelman, bassoon

Volker Treichel, horn

David Ehrlich and Robin Roberts, piano

The Program:

Nielsen: Serenata Invano

Genzmer: Sonata for Klavier and Flute

Beethoven: Trio in G (WOO 37)

Brahms: Nonet (Serenade #1)


The One Hundred Seventy-Sixth Concert

Friday, January 10, 2014, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Volker Treichel, horn

Bob Rosen, piano

Marilyn Austin and Faith Stern, flutes

William Spector, clarinet

The Program:

Works of Rheinberger, Faure, Loeillet, Lane, and Lampkin


The One Hundred Seventy-Fifth Concert

Thursday, December 19, 2013, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Marje Palmieri and Joyce Bouvier, soprano

Christopher Cosgrove, tenor

Harold Yaffe, clarinet

Dilyana Kirova, bassoon

Stephen Brown and David Ehrlich, piano

The Program:

MERRY CHRISTMAS!


The One Hundred Seventy-Fourth Concert

Friday, November 8, 2013, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Natalie Barrens, soprano

Allison Hughes, mezzo-soprano

Brad Tatum, horn

Mary Norris, flute

Jerry Schwarz, Nancy Sulfridge, Bernard Arons, Harold Yaffe and Donald Oehler, clarinet

David Ehrlich, piano

The Program:

MUSIC FOR A NOVEMBER NIGHT

Schubert: An die Musik

Mendelssohn: Konzertstuck II

Schubert: Auf dem Strom

Schumann: Duos for Clarinet/Piano

Mozart: Andantino from Concerto for Flute + Harp

Berlioz: Le jeune patre Breton

Spohr: Three songs

Finzi: Three Bagatelles

Ehrlich: Kol Nidre

Barber: Sure on This Shining Night

Barber: Canzo for Flute/Piano

Shostakovich: Four Waltzes


The One Hundred Seventy-Third Concert

Wednesday, October 9, 2013, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Gwyn Jones, flute

Bernard Arons, clarinet

Rosanne Conway and David Ehrlich, piano

and friends

The Program:

MESSING AROUND!


The One Hundred Seventy-Second Concert

Thursday, August 22, 2013, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Natalie Barrens, soprano

Brad Tatum, horn

Alessandra Schneider, violin

Diana Curtis, cello

Yee-Ning Soong and David Ehrlich, piano

The Program:

MUSIC FOR A SHINING SUMMER NIGHT

Sure on This Shining Night (text James Agee) by Samuel Barber (1910-81)

Feldeinsamkeit (Alone in a Field) by Johannes Brahms (1833-97)

Collibri (Hummingbird) by Ernest Chausson (1855-99)

Andante for Horn und Klavier by Richard Strauss (1864-1949)

Sonata for Horn and Piano - Allegro by Eric Ewazen (1954-)

“Dolly” Suite, op. 45 by Gabriel Fauré (1845-1924)

1. Berceuse - 2. Mi-a-ou - 3. Jardin de Dolly - 4. Kitty-valse - 5. Tendresse - 6.Pas espagnol

I N T E R M I S S I O N


Two Song Transcriptions by Franz Schubert (1797-1828) (arr. Kazimierz Machala)

1. Wohin? - 2. Gretchen am Spinnräde

Song (Text: Christina Rossetti) by Lori Laitman (1955 -)

Night by Florence Price (1887-1963)

Moon River by Henry Mancini (1924-94)

Trio in D Minor, op. 49 by Felix Mendelssohn (1809-47)

1. Allegro agitato - 2. Andante con moto - 3. Scherzo. Vivace - 4. Allegro assai appassionato

The One Hundred Seventy-First Concert

Tuesday, June 11, 2013, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:


The One Hundred Seventieth Concert

Friday, May 24, 2013, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Allison Hughes, mezzo-soprano

Mary Norris, flute

Brad Tatum, horn

Yeng-Ning Soong, piano

David Ehrlich, piano

Program:

“May Night” by Selim Palmgren

“Mainacht” by Johannes Brahms

Sonata 7 in F by G.F. Handel

Sonata for Horn and Piano by Ludwig van Beethoven

Elysian Fields by C.W. Gluck

Two Japanese Songs by arr. R. Hyashi

Romance by Camille Saint-Saens

Ruckert Songs by Gustav Mahler


The One Hundred Sixty-Ninth Concert

Tuesday, March 19, 2013, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

INNOVATI RIVERBEND OPERA COMPANY

Linda Kiemel

Viktoriya Bright

Delia Zielinski

Molly Pinson Simoneau

Kevin Courtemanche

John Turner

Program:

Il Tabarro by Giacomo Puccini

Suor Angelica by Giacomo Puccini


The One Hundred Sixty-Eighth Concert

Thursday, December 20, 2012, 7:30 p.m.

MERRY CHRISTMAS!

Featuring:

Daniel Bochkov and Marje Palmieri, soprano

Marry Norris, flute

Bernie Arons, clarinet

Dilyana Kirova, bassoon

David Ehrlich, piano

Program:

"Amahl and the Night Visitors" by Gian-Carlo Menotti

Our traditional potpourri of carols for all to sing, plus a five-clarinet ensemble


The One Hundred Sixty-Seventh Concert

Thursday, November 15, 2012, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Cathy Amoury, viola

Bernard Arons, clarinet

Carol Hall, violin

Volker Treichel, horn

David Ehrlich and Bob Rosen, piano

Program:

Eight Pieces by Max Bruch

Horn Trio, op. 40 by Johannes Brahms


The One Hundred Sixty-Sixth Concert

Tuesday, October 16, 2012, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Gwyn Jones, flute

Rosanne Conway, piano

Virginia Gardner, cello

Caroline Brethauer, viola

Cyndy Elliot, bass

Program:

Sonata No. 5 in e minor, BWV 1034, J.S. Bach

Concertino for Flute, Viola and Double Bass by Erwin Shulhoff

Sonatina for Flute and Piano by Eldin Burton


The One Hundred Sixty-Fifth Concert

Thursday, September 20, 2012, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Steve Pershing, violin

Theresa Schlafly, viola

Emily Toll, cello

Michael Rohrer, bass

Mary Norris, flute and piccolo

Jerry Schwarz, clarinet

Volker Treichel, horn

Robin Gelman, bassoon

Joyce Bouvier, soprano

David Ehrlich, piano

Program:

Septet in E flat, op. 81b by Ludwig van Beethoven

Preceded by works of CPE Bach, Burgmuller, Mendelssohn, Telemann, Shostakovich


The One Hundred Sixty-Fourth Concert

Tuesday, June 12, 2012, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Kevin Courtmanche (Otello)

Melissa Chavez (Desdemona)

Bryan Jackson (Iago)

John Turner (Cassio)

Program:


The One Hundred Sixty-Third Concert

Tuesday, April 24, 2012, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Cecilie Jones and Joyce Rizzolo, violin

Robert Huesmann, viola

Jan Timbers, cello

Program:

String Quartet in F by Maurice Ravel

String Quartet, op. 51 by Johannes Brahms


The One Hundred Sixty-Second Concert

Friday, March 30, 2012, 7:30 p.m.

OUR GALA FIFTEENTH ANNIVERSARY CHERRY BLOSSOM EXTRAVAGANZA:

Featuring:

Emily Daggett Smith and Regino Madrid, violin

Sara Hart, viola

Karen Ouzounian And Charlie Walters, cello

Gwyn Jones, flute

Jerry Schwarz and Bernard Arons, clarinet

Dilyana Kirova, bassoon

Marje Palmieri, Joyce Bouvier and C.J. Redden-Liotta, singers

David Ehrlich and Lembit Beecher, piano

Program:

Schubert: An die Musik

Mendelssohn: Konzertstuck II (two clarinets)

Cesti: Intorno all idol mio

Mozart: Larghetto from Piano Quartet K. 478

Mozart: Andante from flute/harp concerto

Schubert: Serenade

Schubert: Der Hirt auf dem Felsen

Brahmns/Kirchner: Allegro ma non troppo from String Sextet op. 18 (as piano trio)

Faure: Nell

Gaubert: Madrigal

Vaughan Williams: Two travel songs

Gordon: Waltzing Around Johnny Appleseed (an earlier SWCP commission)

Beecher: Piano Trio commission

J S Bach: Slow movement from two-violin concerto, conducted by Mr. Beecher


The One Hundred Sixty-First Concert

Tuesday, February 28, 2012, 7:00 p.m.

Featuring:

PICTURES ON SILENCE:

Jacqueline Pollauf, harp

Noah Getz, saxophone

Program:

CD Release Concert


The One Hundred Sixtieth Concert

Tuesday, January 31, 2012, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

John Kaboff, cello

Heidi Schuller, flute

Marje Palmieri, soprano

Brad Clark and David Ehrlich, piano

Program:

Works of Martinu, Piazzolla, Beethoven and Chopin


The One Hundred Fifty-Ninth Concert

Tuesday, December 20, 2011, 7:30 p.m.

MERRY CHRISTMAS!

Featuring:

Marje Palmieri and Joyce Bouvier, soprano

John Turner, tenor

Gwyn Jones, flute

Bernard Arons, clarinet

Dilyana Kirova, bassoon

David Ehrlich, piano

Program:

Works of Albinoni, Bach, Mouquet, and lots of Christmas carols!


The One Hundred Fifty-Eighth Concert

Tuesday, November 8, 2011, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

John Kaboff, cello, and Friends

Heidi Schuller, flute

Brad Clark, piano

David Ehrlich, piano

The Program:

Works of Brahms, Villa-Lobos and Mozart


The One Hundred Fifty-Seventh Concert

Thursday, August 18, 2011, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Catherine Justice and Joyce Bouvier, sopranos

John Turner, tenor

David Ehrlich, piano

Dilyana Kirova, bassoon

The Program:

An die Musik (Ode to Music) Franz Schubert (1797-1828)

I Feel a Song Comin’ On by Jimmy McHugh, Dorothy Fields, George Oppenheimer

The Sound of Music (eponymous) by Rodgers & Hammerstein

The Music of the Night (Phantom of the Opera) by Andrew Lloyd Webber

A Nightingale Sang in Berkeley Square by Maschwitz + Sherwin

Sweet Remembrance (Song without Words, op. 19. #1) by Felix Mendelssohn (1809-47)

I Hate Music! by Leonard Bernstein (1918-90)

Let’s Face the Music and Dance by Irving Berlin (1888-1989)

I Walk with Music by Hoagy Carmichael/Johnny Mercer

Music for Awhile by Henry Purcell (1659-95)

If Music be the Food of Love (Twelfth Night) by Purcell

I Have a Song to Sing, O! (Yeoman of the Guard) by Gilbert & Sullivan

The Lost Chord by Sir Arthur Sullivan (1842-1900)

By the Waters of Babylon by Antonin Dvorak (1841-1904)

Sing Ye a Joyful Song by Dvorak

Songs my Mother Taught Me by Dvorak

O Had I Jubal’s Lyre (Joshua) by G.F. Handel (1685-1759)

INTERMISSION

The Singer by Michael Head (1900-76)

La mia canzone (My song) by Francesco Paolo Tosti (1846-1916)

Wie die Melodien zieht es mir by Johannes Brahms (1833-97)

Strange Music by Edvard Grieg (via Wright + Forrest)

With a Song in My Heart by Richard Rodgers + Lorenz Hart

Cádiz by Isaac Albéniz (1860-1909)

Why do they shut me out of Heaven? (poem of Emily Dickinson) by Aaron Copland (1900-1990)

Song (text of Christina Rossetti) by Lori Laitman

Home by Maury Yeaston

The Music of Home (Greenwillow) by Frank Loesser

Sing for your Supper by Rodgers & Hart

I Hear Music by Frank Loesser + Burton Lane

The Song is You by Jerome Kern/Oscar Hammerstein

An die Musik (reprise)


Notes on the Program:

Tonight’s program is about many kinds of music - music of the kind that singers, instrumentalists, and birds make, as well as sounds that are "music to the ears" because they make us happy. These include songs about the music in the heart or in the brain, imaginary music that "plays" when one sees or thinks of a loved one, or songs that praise God or express sadness. "An die Musik," which Schubert set to a poem by his obscure poet friend Franz von Schober, perfectly expresses human feelings toward music: "Thou gracious art, we thank you!" - Joyce Bouvier



The One Hundred Fifty-Fourth Concert

Tuesday, April 12, 2011, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

John Turner, tenor

Delia Zielinski, soprano

Connie Milner and Gail MacColl, violins

Caroline Brethauer, viola

Joanna Taylor, cello

Stephen Brown, piano

Gwyn Jones, flute

David Ehrlich, piano

The Program:

Scenes from the Elysiam Fields (Orpheus) by C.W. Gluck (1714-87)

Oh! Had I Jubal's lyre! by G.F. Handel (1685-1759)

Lascia ch'io pianga by Handel

Sonata for Flute and Keyboard, BWV 1034 by J.S. Bach (1685-1750)

1. Adagio - 2. Allegro - 3. Andante - 4. Allegro

Duetto buffo di due gatti (Two Cats) by Gioachino Rossini (1792-1868)

Syrinx by Claude Debussy (1862-1918)

Intorno all'idol mio (On my idol’s pillow) by Antonio Cesti (1623-69)

Mark my Alford: A favorite Air with Variations by James Hewett (1770-1827)

On Wenlock Edge by Ralph Vaughan Williams (1872-1958)

I. On Wenlock Edge - II. From Far, From Eve and Morning - III. Is My Team Ploughing - IV. Oh When I Was in Love with You - V. Bredon Hill - VI. Clun


The One Hundred Fifty-Third Concert

Thursday, February 24, 2011, 7:30 p.m.

[we love] PARIS WHEN IT DRIZZLES!

Featuring:

Catherine Justice and Joyce Bouvier, sopranos

Harold Yaffe, clarinet

David Ehrlich, piano

The Program:

A Parisian potpourri of opera arias, art chansons, and popular ballads:

I love Paris by Cole Porter (1888-1960)

Early Morning by Robert Hillyer/Ned Rorem (1923-)

Prelude in A major, op. 28, #7 by Frédéric Chopin (1809-47)

Chanson d’avril (Song of April) by Piotr Tchaikowsky (1841-93)

Je veux vivre (from Romeo et Juliette) by Charles Gounod (1818-93)

O quand je dors (O when I sleep!) by Victor Hugo/Franz Liszt (1811-81)

L’attente (The wait) by Hugo/Camille Saint-Saens (1835/1921)

Si mes vers avaient des ailes (If my verses had wings) by Reynaldo Hahn (1875-1947)

L’heure exquise (The exquisite hour) by Paul Verlaine/Hahn

Trois gymnopédies (Gymnastics) by Erik Satie (1866-1925)

Sous le dôme épais (from Lakmé) by Léo Delibes (1836-91)

Comme autrefois (from Les pêcheurs de perles) by Georges Bizet (1838-75)

Couplets des regrets (from Orphée aux enfers) by Jacques Offenbach (1819-80)

INTERMISSION

La fille au cheveux de lin (The girl with the flaxen hair) by Claude Debussy (1862-1918)

Pavane pour une enfant defunte (Pavane for a dead princess) by Maurice Ravel (1875-1943)

Mimi’s Entrance (from La Bohème) by Giacomo Puccini (1858-1924)

Depuis le jour (from Louise) by Gustave Charpentier (1860-1956)

Nell by Leconte de l’Isle/Fauré (1845-1924)

Après un rêve by Fauré

La mer (The sea) by Charles Trenet (1913-2001)

Les feuilles mortes (Autumn Leaves) by Jacques Prévert (1900-77)/Joseph Kosma

Deux escargots (The two snails) by Prévert/Kosma

Bethena, a concert waltz by Scott Joplin (1868-1917)

Domino by Jacques Plante/Louis Ferrari

You don’t know Paree by Porter

The Last Time I Saw Paris (Lady Be Good) by Jerome Kern/ Oscar Hammerstein

Paris Wakes Up and Smiles by Irving Berlin (1888-1989)

Sous le ciel de Paris (Under Paris sky) by Jean Drejac/Hubert Giraud (1920-)


The One Hundred Fifty-Second Concert

Tuesday, August 17, 2010, 7:30 p.m.

The Eyes Have It!

Featuring:

Rosemarie Houghton and Joyce Bouvier, sopranos

Bruce Crane, baritone

John Turner, tenor

Emily Toll, cello

Boxwood Recorders

David Ehrlich, piano

The Program:

An all-vocal program, emphasizing what we see


The One Hundred Fifty-First Concert

Tuesday, June 22, 2010, 7:30 p.m.


The One Hundred Fiftieth Concert

Tuesday, May 25, 2010, 7:30 p.m.

An All-Brahms Concert

Featuring:

Gail Collins, mezzo-soprano

Joan McFarland, soprano

John Turner, tenor

Donald Mclean, viola

Bernard Arons, clarinet

David Ehrlich, piano

The Program:

1. Chaconne, Study #5 (piano solo)

2. Vergebliches Ständchen, op. 84, #4 (mezzo, tenor)

3. Geistliche Wiegenlied, op. 91b (mezzo, viola)

4. Wie Melodien zieht es mir, op. 106, #4 (tenor)

5. Die Mainacht, op. 45, #2 (soprano)

6. Intermezzo in D, op. 118, #2 (piano solo)

7. Alto Rhapsody, op. 53 (mezzo)

8. Clarinet/Viola Sonata, op. 120b (clarinet/viola, piano)

9. Ach, wende diesen Blick, op. 57, #4 (mezzo)

10. In stiller Nacht, Woo 33, #42 (soprano)

11. Feldeinsamkeit, op. 86, #2 (soprano)

12. O wüsst ich doch den Weg, op. 63, #3 (mezzo)

13. Duets, op. 61 (soprano, mezzo)


for the Good Friday service

Friday, April 2, 12:00 p.m.

Featuring:

Harlie Sponaugle and Joyce Bouvier, sopranos

Emily Toll, continuo

David Ehrlich, piano

The Program:

Stabat Mater Dolorosa by Pergolesi


The One Hundred Forty-Ninth Concert

Tuesday, December 22, 2009, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

The Boxwood Recorder Trio (Jane Udelson, Mark McDowell and Bruce Crane)

Joyce Bouvier and Rosemarie Houghton, sopranos

Gwyn Jones and Heidi Schuller, flute

Harold Yaffe, clarinet

Nancy Sulfridge, basset horn

Tom Blackburn, cello

David Ehrlich, piano

The Program:

Wachet Auf, from Cantata 140 by J.S. Bach (1685-1750) (arr. Z. Kocsis)

O COME ALL YE FAITHFUL by Traditional

Velvet Shoes by Randall Thompson (1896-1984)

Madrigal by Philippe Gaubert (1879-1941)

Duett (Song Without Words #18) by Felix Mendelssohn (1809-47)

Konzertstuck #1 in A flat, op. 113 by Mendelssohn

HARK THE HERALD ANGELS SING by Mendelssohn

Magnificat on the Fifth Tone (1542) by Georg Forster (ca. 1515-60)

INTERMISSION

Cantique de Jean Racine by Gabriel Fauré (1845-1924)

IN THE DEEP MIDWINTER by Christina Rossetti/Gustav Holst (1874-1934)

Ave Maria by Luigi Luzzi (1828-76)

Serenade (Ständchen) by Franz Schubert (1797-1828)

Agnus Dei by Georges Bizet (1838-75)

O LITTLE TOWN OF BETHLEHEM by Phillips Brooks/Lewis Redner

Adagio from Clarinet Concerto, K. 626 by W.A. Mozart (1756-91)

O HOLY NIGHT by Adolphe Adam (1803-56)


Notes on the Program:

While we do put the weight on Christmas as we select music for tonight’s program, we are of course not unaware that Christmas is but one manifestation of the ways in which we twenty-first century Americans approach this joyful time of the year. Whether our orientation is Christian or not, we must recognize that Jesus Christ was a Jew, and that many of the principles underlying Islam are spiritually similar to Christianity. Moreover, at this time of year, we ought not ignore there’s so much more to the meaning of the seasonal celebrations we enjoy than the feckless commercial aspects of life that have forced themselves far too much into our everyday consciousness.

Christmas carols are only one of the ways of expressing the joy that we all find being alive for yet one more year in our beautiful city, in our wonderful country, and in the company of each other. May we all draw pleasure from the know-ledge that we are who we are and doing exactly what we are doing as we have been doing for all the years of our lives!

Or, as Tiny Tim used to say, "Merry Christmas and God bless us every one!"


The One Hundred Forty-Eighth Concert

Tuesday, November 24, 2009, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

The Twenty-Two Voices of the Genussa Clarinet Choir

Heidi Schuller, flute

Harold Yaffe, clarinet

David Ehrlich, piano

The Program:

Mussorgsky: Pictures at an Exhibition

Saint-Saens: Tarantella

Works of Rossini and Grainger


The One Hundred Forty-Seventh Concert

Thursday, September 24, 2009, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Joyce Bouvier and Rosemarie Houghton, sopranos

John Turner, tenor

Heidi Schuller, flute

Harold Yaffe, clarinet

David Ehrlich, piano

The Program:

AMERICAN VOCAL MUSIC of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries - Samuel Barber, Aaron Copland, Victor Herbert, Ned Rorem, and others


The One Hundred Forty-Sixth Concert

Tuesday, July 21, 2009, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

RIVERBEND OPERA

Jose Sacin / Don Giovanni

Robert Ritter / Leporello

Jennifer Hosmer / Donna Anna

Heather Bingham / Donna Elvira

Adriana Balzan / Zerlina

John Turner / Don Ottavio

Zain Shariff / Masetto

Sean Pflueger / Il Commendatore

Kathy Detwiler, piano

Molly Khatcheressian, conductor

The Program:

Don Giovanni (semi-staged concert form)


The One Hundred Forty-Fifth Concert

Thursday, July 2, 2009, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Dilyana Kirova, bassoon

Harold Yaffe, clarinet

Edward Neaman, piano

Anthony Asero, percussion

Noor Jihan, folk dancer

The Program:

Exotic dances from Bulgaria


The One Hundred Forty-Fourth Concert

Friday, May 1, 2009, 7:30 p.m.
Admission: $20 (this concert only!)

Featuring:

THE KLAVIER TRIO AMSTERDAM:

Joan Berkheimer, violin

Nadia David, cello

Klara Würtz, piano

The Program:

Partita #1 in B-flat by J.S. Bach (1685-1750)

1. Praeludium - 2. Allemande - 3. Corrente - 4. Sarabande - 5. Minuets 1,2 - 6.Giga

Sonatina in G, op. 100 by Antonin Dvorak (1841-1904)

1. Allegro risoluto - 2. Larghetto - 3. Scherzo. Molto vivace - 4. Finale. Allegro

Tzigane by Maurice Ravel (1875-1937)

INTERMISSION

Trio in C major, op. 87 by Johannes Brahms (1833-97)

1. Allegro - 2. Andante con moto - 3. Scherzo. Presto - 4. Finale. allegro giocoso

About the Artists

In the year 1990, inspired by their love for the chamber music repertoire, two musicians from the East of Europe,  Hungarian-born Klára Würtz  and Romanian-born, Israeli-nurtured Nadia David, decided to join forces with the Dutchman Joan Berkhemer to form the Klavier Trio Amsterdam and shortly afterward initiated their collective career with a concert in the Amsterdam Concertgebouw.  From then , the rest is history.  In 1992 they were invited for a two‑month tour through Israel, where they performed in the major cities and concert halls. They were special guests at the Jaffa Chamber Music Festival, and made recordings for the YMCA.  In 1993 they performed during a festival in Rome; a year later, they toured Germany with great success, and have since then received yearly invitations. In 1996 the Dutch Embassy invited them to play in honor of the Prime Minister’s official visit to Israel. More invitations soon followed from. the Dutch Embassies in Washington and London, which allowed the trio to be-come acquainted with a variety of concert halls abroad. In 1997 and 1998 they were guests at the Festung Konzerten in Salzburg, and in the following summer they were invited for several concerts in Athens plus a tour of  Colombia. By 2000 they felt themselves ready to make a recording, and a CD of the two Mendelssohn piano trios was released by Erasmus, which was acclaimed as "the best of the year 2000" by the New York critic Harris Goldsmith in the International Record Review, not to mention being extremely well received by the press, radio and television in their own country, where it was  played daily on radio. During the summer of 2001, they were guests at the Chamber Music Festival in Dinant, France. Upcoming plans include concerts in New York City, the Amsterdam Concertgebouw, as well as recordings of the Schumann piano trios and trios by Russian composers.


Notes on the Program

Partita was originally the name for a single instrumental piece of music (16th and 17th centuries), but Johann Kuh-hnau and later German composers (notably J.S. Bach) used it for collections of musical pieces, as a synonym for suite.  Bach wrote two sets of partitas for different instruments and several for solo keyboard of which this is the first and best known.

The charming little Dvorak piece was written for his son during the composer’s summer in Iowa between his seasons at the New York Philharmonic.

Ravel’s near-impossibly challenging Tzigane is a rhapsodic composition the Frenchman wrote in 1924 and dedicated to the Hungarian Geli d’Aranyi, one of the world’s then-reigning violinists.  The piece’s title, derived from the generic European term for "gypsy" (although it doesn’t use any authentic gypsy melodies), was  a kind of popular musical exoticism, comparable perhaps to the Spanish exoticism of Ravel's day (remember that his birthplace was the foothills of the Pyrenees). Scored originally for violin with accompaniment by luthéal (a gypsy-sounding cembalom) that version was for many years (though no longer) available at publishers, a fact that reminds us of  Schubert's long-extinct arpeggione.

Opus 87 is the least familiar of the Brahms trios, and it is a real treat to hear it tonight. Written in 1882 with the composer in the full prime of an extraordinarily creative life, this work reflects the distance he has traveled since his musical baptism at Robert Schumann’s knee, from the recognizable Hungarian folk tune of the slow movement to the almost Halloween-like ghostliness of the scherzo.


The One Hundred Forty-Third Concert

Wednesday, April 29, 2009, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Gwyn Jones and Visnja Kosanovic, flute

Harold Yaffe and Jerry Schwarz, clarinet

Peggy Orchowski, violin

Judith McDaniel, cello

David Ehrlich, piano

The Program:

Trio in G Major, op. 119 by Friedrich Kuhlau (1786-1832)

1. Allegro moderato - 2. Adagio patetico - 3. Allegro

Trio in E-flat Major, op. 44 Louise Farrenc (1804-75)

1. Andante. Allegro moderato - 2. Adagio - 3. Minuetto: Allegro - 4. Allegro

INTERMISSION

Trio in G Major (1880) by Claude Debussy (1862-1918)

1. Andantino con molto allegro - 2. Scherzo: Moderato con allegro - 3. Andante espressivo - 4. Finale: Appassionato

About Us

Visnja Kosanovic brings us her flute from Serbia, where she earned degrees at the Academy of Art in Novi Sad before being invited to study with Peter-Louis Graf at the Summer Mozarteum in Salzburg.  Since coming to this country, she’s appeared frequently with us and, occasionally, the National Gallery Orchestra. But mostly, Visnja concentrates on her twin interests: teaching flute, which she does at Levine and the International School, and yoga.

Twelve-year Southwest resident Gwyn Jones enjoys being part of the Southwest Chamber Players. She takes time from her day job as communications director for the U.S. Green Building Council to perform with a range of  ensembles: her own Zephyr Quintet, the Capital Wind and American University symphonies, and Columbia Flute Choir. Gwyn holds a master’s from Florida State and was a teaching fellow at the University of North Texas. She studies with Keith Bryan.

Harold Yaffe retired from a career in environmental management consulting to pursue a lifelong love of the clarinet.  His early music activities the New Hampshire Philharmonic Orchestra and MIT concert band. He currently plays with the Capital Wind Symphony and Fairfax Symphony’s summer band. His teacher in Philadelphia was Karen DiSanto; here he works at Levine with Sidney Forrest.

SWCP stalwart Jerry Schwarz began his musical studies in Los Angeles at age ten and was U.C. Berkeley’s principal clarinet. He served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Senegal and taught English at American University. An avid chamber musician Jerry’s appeared on nearly half of our SWCP programs since 1997 and founded two groups of his own.

California girl Peggy Orchowski has played in violins since she and her twin sister made 2/3 of a trio with one of her mother’s students at the age of seven. Since rediscovering the joy of making chamber music some twenty years ago, she has taken it to exotic places like Prague and Corfu.

Cellist Judith McDaniel has taught homiletics at Virginia Theological Seminary in Alexandria for twenty years.  Prior to that, she served parishes in western Washington state.  Starting on the violin, she moved to cello six years ago.

SWCP founder/director David Ehrlich learned the piano from his father Richard in Boston, starting at the age of six. Since realizing (at 7) that he wasn’t going to be the next Horowitz, he’s spent a lifetime as an amateur playing in such varied venues as Eugene, Oregon; Tiburon, Calif.; New York City; Milton, Mass., and Nagydorog, Hungary. He enjoys turning handsprings for his wonderful teacher Naoko Takao.


Notes on the Program

Kuhlau lived much of his life in Copenhagen, where he worked as theater composer and court musician. Though a pianist by trade, his compositions mostly involved the flute, and it is for tonight’s trio that he is chiefly known.

It was Louise Farrenc’s misfortune (as least as far as posterity is concerned) to have been born a woman in early nineteenth-century France who did not compose opera. While her instruction was in the finest Viennese tradition (see how much of Beethoven and Schubert you can hear!), she was French to the core. She was however, most fortunate of  all  in her choice of husband – her man was among Paris’s foremost music publishers, and he made sure that every note she wrote got into print just as she wrote it.

Debussy, tonight’s only truly familiar name, was evidently an audacious enfant terrible when he was invited at the age of eighteen to be music instructor to Nadezhda con Meck, who was Tchaikowsky’s benefactor. This glorious trio, lush with the newly fashionable form of impressionism, was written in her service and not performed for many years afterward.


The One Hundred Forty-Second Concert

Good Friday, April 10, 2009, 12:00 p.m.

Featuring:

Joyce Bouvier, soprano

Harlie Sponaugle, mezzo-soprano

David Ehrlich, piano

Judith McDaniel, cello

The Program:

Stabat Mater Dolorosa by Giovanni Battista Pergolesi


The One Hundred Forty-First Concert

Thursday, February 12, 2009, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Joyce Bouvier, soprano

David Ehrlich, piano

The Program:

Love Songs of Four Centuries


The One Hundred Fortieth Concert

Thursday, December 18, 2008, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Rosemarie Houghton, Joyce Bouvier, Tom Blackburn, Jerry Schwarz, and more

The Program:

Our traditional potpourri: Bach, Christmas carols and Potomac Mandolins and...six clarinets!


The One Hundred Thirty-Ninth Concert

Tuesday, November 11, 2008, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Yale alumni singers

Harold Yaffe, clarinet

Dilyana Kirova, bassoon

David Ehrlich, piano

The Program:

An evening of men's close harmony a cappella music featuring some arrangements of Fritz Kinzel, the 1958 Yale Whiffenpoofs' legendary leader. Performing will be singers from The Augmented Eight and Top of the Seventh, both of which boast a high proportion of old Yalies, whose program will be part their own, part Yale Songbook.

Trio in E flat by Louise Farrenc


The One Hundred Thirty-Eighth Concert

Thursday, July 31, 2008, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Catherine Justice, coloratura soprano

Visnja Kosanovic, flute

Harold Yaffe, clarinet

David Ehrlich, piano

The Program:

Arias of Mozart (Die Entfuhrung aus dem Serail, Ah vous dirai-je maman)

Songs of Bizet, Faure and Roussel

Der Hirt aus dem Felsen by Franz Schubert

Works for clarinet and piano by Franz Liszt and Barmann

Works for flute and piano by Ganne and Brun


The One Hundred Thirty-Seventh Concert

Tuesday, June 17, 2008, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

John Turner, tenor

John Boulanger, baritone

Harold Yaffe, clarinet

Sallie Klunk, flute

David Klunk, Stephen Brown, and David Ehrlich, piano

The Program:

Travel Songs (texts of Robert Louis Stevenson) by Ralph Vaughan Williams

Madrigal by Philippe Gaubert

Works of Debussy, Liszt, and Schumann for clarinet and piano


The One Hundred Thirty-Sixth Concert

Tuesday, May 6, 2008, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

The Lennox String Quartet:

Cecilie Jones and Joyce Rizzolo, violins

Robert Huesmann, viola

Jan Timbers, cello

with John Turner, tenor

The Program:

Dover Beach by Samuel Barber

Quartets of Mozart and Shostakovich


The One Hundred Thirty-Fifth Concert

Friday, March 28, 2008, 12:00 p.m.
The Georgetown Club

Featuring:

Gwyn Jones, flute

Jerry Schwarz, clarinet

David Ehrlich, piano

The Program:

Rondo, "Rage over a Lost Penny", op. 129  by Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)

Andante from Concerto for Flute and Harp, K. 295 by W.A. Mozart  (1756-91)

Variations on "Trock'ne Blumen: Introduction, Tema, Variation 1 by Franz Schubert (1797-1827)

Trio on "Standchen" (Serenade) by Franz Schubert

Irlandaise, from Suite for Flute and Jazz Piano by Claude Bolling (b. 1930)

Adagio from Clarinet Concerto, K. 622 by W.A. Mozart

"Carmen" Rhapsody (based on themes from Bizet's opera) by Michael Webster (b. 1952)


About Our Artists

The Southwest Chamber Players is a loose aggregation of more than 100 enthusiastic amateur musicians who have performed monthly at Saint Augustine's Episcopal Church in Southwest Washington for the last ten years. Though founder and director David Ehrlich's life's work was in the retail business, he never lost touch with performing music, honing his skills at chamber music workshops in North Carolina, South Carolina, and Vermont. SWCP has a few rules:  (1) No required $$ change hands; (2) Performers are not paid; and (3) Admission to concerts is free.

Gwyn Jones, a performing member of the Friday Morning Music Club, holds a Master of Music from Florida State and was a teaching fellow at the University of North Texas, where her teachers included Claire Durand Racato, Charles Delaney, and Mary Karen Clardy. Gwyn takes time from her day job at the U.S. Green Building Council to perform with a range of ensembles: her own Zephyr Quintet, the Capital Wind Symphony, American University Symphony, and Columbia Flute Choir.

Jerry Schwarz began his musical studies in Los Angeles at age ten and was UC- Berkeley Symphony's principal clarinet. He served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Senegal and taught English at American University, broken by a year's Fulbright in Florence and Barcelona. An avid chamber musician (and father of two more), Jerry's appeared on nearly half of our SWCP programs since 1997 as well as founding the woodwind trios Con Brio.

David Ehrlich, vice chair of the Beethoven Society, learned piano from his father, Richard, in Boston, starting at the age of six. Since discovering (at seven) he wasn't destined to be the next Horowitz, he's resigned himself to life as an amateur, playing for friends in Tiburon, Cal.; New York City; and Nagydorog, Hungary, and studying with Matthew Van Hoose at the Levine School.


Notes on the Program

Rutter’s Suite Antique was written in 1979 when he was asked to write a piece for the Cookham Festival, performed by Duke Dobing and the London Baroque Soloists in Cookham Parish Church. Since Bach's Brandenburg Concerto No.5 was on the program, he decided to write for the same combination of instruments – flute, harpsi-chord, and strings, in the form and style of Bach's day. He also wrote this evening’s piano reduction. The six movements range from a Bach-like aria to a Richard Rodgers-style waltz. Artfully juxtaposing the "old" with the "new," Rutter's own style comes through most clearly in the final two movements: the simple and plaintive chanson; and the rondeau with its characteristically forward-driving rhythms and beautiful melodic lines.

Copland’s Duo was composed on commission from a group of pupils and friends of the late Kincaid, for many years solo flutist of the Philadelphia Orchestra and considered to be the father of the Ameri-can school of flute playing. Although Copland studied in Paris with Nadia Boulanger, he used American folk music jazz, and serial tech-niques in his music. The duo draws on material from his sketchbooks of the 1940s, returning to the lyricism of Appalachian Spring . As a duo, the flute and piano engage in conversation-like fugues and intertwined passages throughout, from the elegiac opening movement through the playful and energetic third movement. The simple, direct melodies combined with intricate use of rhythm and meter mark this work as distinctly Copland.

We think these charming waltzes make a nice counterpoint to our flute recital. Writing them in 1865 and dedicating them to Viennese critic Eduard Hanslick, Brahms said, "Your name came up in spite of itself...I was thinking of Vienna, of the pretty girls with whom you play duets, of you who like such things, my friend, and what not..."

The Sonata in D was Prokofiev’s only work for flute, but one of the most important works in the flute repertoire. Prokofiev was a virtuoso pianist in addition to his obvious gifts as a composer. He entered the St. Petersburg Conservatory at 13, and at 19 made his first public appearance in St. Petersburg. Although the he traveled widely from 1918 to 1934, he found he missed his homeland terribly and returned to the Soviet Union, where he was considered a leading composer of the Soviet School. Ironically, in later years, his works, along with those of Shostakovich and Khatchaturian, would be removed from the Soviet repertory because of their "bourgeois formalism" -- no doubt due to his years abroad. The Sonata was written in the summer of 1941 after Prokofiev had been evacuated from Moscow to avoid the dangers of the German invasion. In the relative quiet, close to nature, he wrote a work that perhaps reflects the many emotions of those challenging times, from serene simplicity to witty to pensive and brooding to strong and passionate. Premiered in Moscow, 1943 at the height of Prokofiev’s popularity in the Soviet Union, this piece is a traditional work in form and in character reminiscent of the composer’s Classical Symphony and Love for Three Oranges.


The One Hundred Thirty-Fourth Concert

FRIDAY, MARCH 21, 2008, 12:00 p.m.

Featuring:

Joyce Bouvier, soprano

Eunice Hawley, alto

John Turner, tenor

Eric Slaughter, baritone

David Ehrlich, piano

The Program:

Assisting in the service for Good Friday


The One Hundred Thirty-Third Concert

Tuesday, January 29, 2008, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

John Kaboff, cello

Lydia Frumkin, piano

The Program:

Sonatas of Locatelli, Schubert and Rachmaninoff


The One Hundred Thirty-Second Concert

Friday, December 14, 2007, 7:30 p.m.

MERRY CHRISTMAS!

Featuring:

Rosemarie Houghton and Joyce Bouvier, sopranos

Sarah Frook, alto

John Turner, tenor

Jonathan Ward, baritone

Jerry Schwarz, clarinet

David Ehrlich, piano

The Saint Charles String Quartet:

Neil Puzon and Victoria Liu, violins

Gabe Soloff, viola

Kirill Romanov, cello

The Program:

Wachet Auf, ruft uns die Stimme by J.S. Bach (1685-1750)

Alleluia by Antonio Vivaldi (1678-1741)

O Come all ye Faithful (Traditional)

Presto scherzando (Quartet Op.20, #4, in D Major) by Franz Josef Haydn (1732-1809)  

Allegro (Quartet Op.51, #1, in C minor) by Johannes Brahms (1833-97)

Waltz of the Flowers from Nutcracker Suite by Peter I. Tchaikovsky (1840-93)

I  N  T  E  R  M  I  S  S  I  O  N

Hark the Herald Angels Sing (Felix Mendelssohn (1809-47))

The Vagabond Song by Ralph Vaughan Williams (1872-1958)

Messiah, Part One by George Frideric Handel (1685-1759):

Overture
O thou that Tellest Good Tidings
Comfort Ye My People
Pastoral Symphony
Every Valley Shall Be Exalted
He Shall Feed His Flock
And the Glory of the Lord
There Were Shepherds in the Fields
Thus Saith the Lord
Glory to God
Who May Abide the Day of his Coming?

Adagio from Clarinet Concerto by W.A. Mozart (1756-91)

O Holy Night (Adolphe Adam (1803-56))


About the Quartet

Based in Southern Maryland, the St. Charles String Quartet was founded in 2004 by Neil Puzon and Gabe Soloff as an opportunity to read chamber music. Since then, the quartet has evolved and participated in educational outreach programs and performed for numerous events. Faculty members of the United States Navy War College called them "a class act" and "the best we've heard."

Their 2007 season includes debut performances at the Library of Congress, Whitall Pavilion, Mattawoman Creek "Arts in Park" Festival, and the Lurman Summer Concert Series. They've also appeared at the White House Military Office and the French and Italian embassies. Members have studied chamber music at the University of Maryland, Temple University, and Yale, together with various prestigious ensembles including the Juilliard and Sunrise string quartets. These musicians continue to be acknowledged for their technique and exciting repertoire.


The One Hundred Thirty-First Concert

Tuesday, November 27, 2007, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Renee Roberts, violin

Visnja Kosanovic, flute

Jason Koczur, horn

David Ehrlich, piano

The Program:

Horn Concerto #3 in E flat, K. 488 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)

Pastorale by Eric Ewazen (1954-)

Carmen Fantasy for Flute by Francis Borne

Sonata for Violin and Piano by Felix Mendelssohn (1803-1847)

Allegro vivace - Adagio - Assai vivace

The One Hundred Thirtieth Concert

Tuesday, September 18, 2007, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

The Lennox String Quartet

Barbara Wing, piano

The Program:

Quartet in G major, op. 77, #1 by Josef Haydn

"Eyeglasses" Duo by Ludwig Van Beethoven

"Dumky" Trio, op. 90 by Antonin Dvorak


The One Hundred Twenty-Ninth Concert

Tuesday, August 14, 2007, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Joyce Bouvier, Marcia d'Arcangelo, Rosemarie Houghton, and Catherine Justice, sopranos

John Turner, tenor

Jonathan Ward, baritone

Gwyn Jones, flute

Jerry Schwarz, clarinet

Tom Blackburn, cello

David Ehrlich, piano

The Program:

Scenes from the Elysian Fields (Orpheus and Eurydice) (Gluck)

Au fond du temple saint (Pearl Fishers) (Bizet)

Et tu vuoi? Flavio Cunibert (Gabrieli)

The Moon and I (Mikado) (Gilbert & Sullivan)

Du schöne Abendstern (Tannhäuser) (Wagner)

Sous le döme épais (Lakmé) (Delibes)

E lucevan stelle (Tosca) (Puccini)

Meditation (Thais) (Massenet)

A Real Slow Drag (Tremonisha) (Joplin)

Volta la terra (Ballo in maschera) (Verdi)

Prince Yeletzki (Pique Dame) Tchaikowsky)

Ritorno vincitor (Aida) (Verdi)

Fantasy (Carmen) (Bizet/Webster)

Una voce poco fa (Barber of Seville) (Rossini)

Pace, pace (La Forza del destino) (Verdi)

No pueder ser (trad. Zarzuela)

Wheree’er you walk (Semele) (Handel)

Sempre libera (La Traviata) (Verdi)

Soave s’il vento (Cosi fan tutte) (Mozart)

True Love (The Sorcerer) (Gilbert & Sullivan)

Nessum dorma (Turandot) (Puccini)

Credo in uno dio (Othello) (Verdi)


The One Hundred Twenty-Eighth Concert

Thursday, July 26, 2007, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

The Columbia String Quartet:

Heather Rieff and Helen French, violin

Phillips Hinch, viola

Hyun Sun Kim, cello

Also:

Peggy Orchowski, violin

Matthew Van Hoose and David Ehrlich, piano

The Program:

"Harp" Quartet, op. 74 by Beethoven

"La Follia" sonata and variations by Corelli

"Gypsy Rondo" trio by Haydn

Marches Militaires for piano four-hands by Schubert


The One Hundred Twenty-Seventh Concert

Tuesday, June 19, 2007, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Jerry Schwarz, clarinet

Graham Down and Elizabeth Dyson, piano

Carol Hall, viola

Elizabeth Lawrence, soprano

The Program:

Works of Mozart, Schubert, Herrmann and Rota


The One Hundred Twenty-Sixth Concert

Thursday, May 3, 2007, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Sharon Pabon, flute

Melissa Tardiff Dvorak, harp

The Program:

Sonata for Flute and Harp by Gaetano Donizetti (1797-1848)

I. Larghetto - II. Allegro

Serenade No. 10 for Flute and Harp, Op. 79 by Vincent Persichetti (1915-87)

I. Larghetto - II. Allegro commodo - III. Andante grazioso - IV. Andante cantabile - V. Allegretto - VI. Scherzando - VII. Adagietto - VIII. Vivo

Deuxieme Suite in G Major by Joseph Bodin de Boismortier (1689 – 1755)

I. Prelude - II. Bourrée - III. Musette en rondeau - IV. Gigue - V. Rigaudons I & II

Chanson dans la Nuit by Carlos Salzedo (1885-1961)

I N T E R M I S S I O N

Café 1930 from Histoire du Tango by Astor Piazzolla (1921-92)

Phantasy on Themes of Japanese Folksongs by Josef Molnar (b.1929)

Greensleeves Variations by Traditional/ (arr. Fleury/Owens)


The Tenth Anniversary Concert
The One Hundred Twenty-Fifth Concert

Monday, April 9, 2007, 7:30 p.m.

OUR ANNUAL SALUTE TO THE CHERRY BLOSSOMS

Featuring:

Visnja Kosanovic and Gwyn Jones, flute

Nancy Sulfridge and Jerry Schwarz, clarinet

Hyun Sun Kim, cello

Marcia d'Arcangelo, Rosemarie Houghton and Joyce Bouvier, soprano

John Turner, tenor

Jonathan Ward, baritone

David Ehrlich, piano

The Program:

Four Fantasy Pieces for clarinet and piano by Niels Gade (1817-1890)

Variations on "Trock'ne Blumen" for flute and piano by Franz Schubert (1798-1828)

"Ashlandia," a piano quartet newly commissioned for the Southwest Chamber Players by Louis Gordon (1926-)

Appalachian and other American folksongs by Aaron Copland and John Jacob Niles


Who We Are

"Ashlandia" was financed by our Southwest neighbor Maurice Boyd, who has been a good friend of the SWCP through the last ten years. Maurice and his wife Anna have lived in Capitol Park, Southwest, for more than three decades after moving to D.C. from Ashland Ohio, and wishes to remember Ashland communities throughout the United States with this music.

Visnja Kosanovic brings us her flute from Serbia, where she earned degrees at the Academy of Art in Novi Sad before being invited to study with Peter-Lukas Graf at the Summer Mozarteum in Salzburg. Since coming here, she's appeared frequently with us and, occasionally, the National Gallery Orchestra. But mostly, Visnja concentrates on her twin interests: teaching flute (which she does at Levine) and yoga.

Jerry Schwarz began his musical studies in Los Angeles at age ten and was UC-Berkeley Symphony's principal clarinet. He served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Senegal and taught English at American University, broken by a year's Fulbright in Florence and Barcelona. An avid chamber musician (and father of two more), Jerry's appeared on nearly half of our SWCP programs since 1997 as well as founding the woodwind trios Con Brio and Focus.

Nancy Sulfridge began her study of clarinet in 6th grade in Michigan and was introduced to chamber music in high school through membership in the Grosse Pointe Chamber Music Society and in college as a foreign student at the Friedrich Alexander Universität in Erlangen, Germany. After a long hiatus, she rediscovered chamber music while in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Currently, she is a member of the Pan American Symphony, and she and her husband are part of a chamber music performance class at George Washington. When not making music, she teaches adult education in Charles County, Md.

John Turner has performed with many opera companies in the Washington area and is often cast in character roles, rising briefly from the chorus to take up some time while the stars emote and regain their strength. He’s recently appeared as a soloist in La Bohème for the Puccini Center, The Barber of Seville, Amahl, Eugene Onegin, and Rigoletto with Bel Cantanti Opera, Pagliacci with Eldbrooke Opera, La Somnambula with Opera Bel Canto, and La Traviata with Bethesda Summer Opera. He performs with Summer Opera at Catholic University and with Victorian Lyric Opera.

Jonathan Ward is the baritone soloist at St. Francis Episcopal Church in Potomac, and plays five-string banjo with the local bluegrass group Don't Tell Bob. Daytimewise, Jonathan is an organizational consultant and executive coach with Right Management, Inc.

Trained in opera and art songs, soprano Joyce Bouvier, who’s equally comfortable singing and playing popular music, has been Southwest Chamber Players’ most consistent stalwart, ever since her debut in May 1997!

For her musical pedigree, soprano Marcia d’Arcangelo looks back to two of her peasant forebears, one of whom was an Italian shepherd, while the other, an Austrian, made reeds for Mozart’s wind players, We’re awfully glad that Marcia is here rather than in Chicago - she skipped a meeting there just to sing with us!

David Ehrlich learned the piano from his father, Richard, in Boston, starting at the age of six. Discovering (at seven) he wasn't destined to be the next Horowitz, he's resigned himself to life as a musical amateur. Starting Southwest Chamber Players ten years ago, he’s gone back to aggressively studying the piano with Matthew van Hoose and playing for friends in places like Milton, Mass.; Eugene, Oregon; Tiburon, Calif.; New York City; and Nagydorog, Hungary.

Soprano Rosemarie Houghton hails originally from Pittsburgh. Since moving here, she's sung numerous times with the National Symphony and appeared with Coral Cantigas, a Latin-American chamber choir, while teaching voice at Catholic University and Northern Virginia Community College.

Twelve-year Southwest resident Gwyn Jones enjoys being part of the Southwest Chamber Players. She takes time from her day job as communications services manager for the U.S. Green Building Council to perform with a range of ensembles: her own Zephyr Quintet, the Capital Wind Symphony, American University Symphony, and Columbia Flute Choir. A performing member of the Friday Morning Music Club, Gwyn holds a Master of Music from Florida State and was a teaching fellow at the University of North Texas, where her teachers included Claire Durand Racato, Charles Delaney, and Mary Karen Clardy. She studies with Keith Bryan of the University of Michigan.

Cellist Hyun Sun Kim began her cello studies at the relatively late age of ten at the Manhattan School of Music and continued in the College Division while attending Barnard College. Summers were spent in various music camps including Meadowmount and Sarah Lawrence College. After attending University of Pittsburgh Law School, Hyun ended up working here, and sought refuge by playing in orchestras and chamber groups. When not running between rehearsals, she works as an attorney at the Consumer Product Safety Commission. Hyun is very proud of her Columbia String Quartet, which will appear here in late May.


The One Hundred Twenty-Fourth Concert

Friday, April 6, 2007, 12:00 p.m.

Featuring:

Carol Hall and Peggy Orchowski, violin

Kathy Ferger, viola

Tom Blackburn, cello

The Program:

Seven Last Words on the Cross by Franz Josef Haydn


The One Hundred Twenty-Third Concert

Tuesday, February 27, 2007, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

The Ironwood Recorders

Margaret Harrison, Joyce Bouvier, Terry LaGoe, soprano

Emily Toll, cello

Dan Spadoni, percussion

David Ehrlich, piano


The One Hundred Twenty-Second Concert

Tuesday, December 19, 2006, 7:30 p.m.

MERRY CHRISTMAS!

Featuring:

Rosemarie Houghton and Joyce Bouvier, soprano

John Turner, tenor

Gwyn Jones , flute

Jerry Schwarz, clarinet

Nancy Sulfridge, clarinet and basset horn

Dilyana Kirova, bassoon

David Ehrlich, piano

The Potomac Mandolin Ensemble:

Lynn Falk, mandolin; Annette Henzke, mandolin; Pat Kibler, mandola; Edith Pötzschke, mandolin

Program:

Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme (Cantata 140) by J.S. Bach (1685-1750)

Quia Respexit (Magnificat) by J.S. Bach

Comfort Ye, My People (Messiah) by G.F. Handel (1685-1759)

Every Valley shall be Exalted (Messiah) by Handel

Concerto in D minor by Tomaso Albinoni (1671-1751)

O Come All Ye Faithful (Traditional)

In the Deep Midwinter by Christina Rossetti/Gustav Holst

The Flower of Jesse by J.J. Niles

What songs were sung by Niles

Jesus. Jesus. Rest Your Head by Niles

Carol of the Birds by Niles

Konzertstuck for Two Clarinets by Felix Mendelssohn (1809-47)

Hark the Herald Angels Sing by Mendelssohn

Carol of the Bells by Leontovich

Pavane by Gabriel Fauré (1845-1924)

O Little Town of Bethlehem by Lewis Redner/Phillips Brooks

The Small Christmas Tree by Michael Head

O Holy Night by Adolphe Adam

The Potomac Mandolin Ensemble:

La petite princesse by Hardy
Sonata rimpianto by Toselli
Humoresque by Dvorak
Melodie by Schumann
Sleeping Prince by Henze


The One Hundred Twenty-First Concert

Tuesday, November 14, 2006, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

The Lennox Quartet:

Cecilie Jones and Joyce Rizzolo, violin

Robert Huesmann, viola

Jan Timbers, cello

Program:

Quartet in D major, op. 64, #5 by Joseph Haydn

Quartet in G Major, op. 116 by Antonin Dvorak


The One Hundred Twentieth Concert

Thursday, October 19, 2006, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

The Saint Petersburg Trio

Svetlana Nikonova, domra; Vladimir Zaxarevich, bayan (accordion); and Andrei Saveliev, kontrabass balalaika

Program:

Three exceptionally skilled balalaika players will present a fascinating mix of surprisingly familiar classical favorites with soulful Russian folksongs.


The One Hundred Nineteenth Concert

Tuesday, September 26, 2006, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

John Kaboff, Cello

David Kosutic, Piano

Brian Jones, Clarinet

Diane Pyles, Piano

Program:

Adagio and Allegro, op. 70 by Robert Schumann

Sonata in g minor for Cello and Piano, op. 65 by Frederic Chopin

Three Pieces for Clarinet, Cello and Piano by Max Bruch

Trio for Clarinet, Cello and Piano by Louise Ferenc

Baal Shem Suite by Ernst Bloch

Nigun (Improvisation) (1880-1959)


The One Hundred Eighteenth Concert

Saturday, September 23, 2006, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Eduardo Castro, bass-baritone

David Ehrlich, piano

Program:

To be announced


About the Artist

Peruvian bass-baritone Eduardo Castro came to the United States in 1991 to study at George Mason as well as Catholic University. His SWCP debut was August 24. Prior to that, his local performances included the roles of both Schaunard and Colline in La Boheme, Don Alfonso in Cosi Fan Tutte, Ferrando in Il Trovatore, and Coumt Rodolfo in La Somnambula. He has also been involved with Bel Cantanti Opera and Zarzuela Disi, and is currently working to prepare several roles with the Virginia Opera Company in Virginia Beach.

In addition to a number of opera arias, his program will include several Schubert lieder and some good ol' U.S. pop.


The One Hundred Seventeenth Concert

Thursday, August 24, 2006, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Marcia D’Arcangelo, Rosemarie Houghton and Joyce Bouvier, sopranos

John Turner, tenor

Eduardo Castro and Bruce Crane, bass

Gwyn Jones, flute

Emily Toll, cello

John Findley, horn

David Ehrlich, piano

Program:

Water Music Suites 1 and 3 by G.F. Handel

Wohin? (Where to?) by Franz Schubert

Die Forelle (The Trout) by Schubert

Cruising Down the River by Beadell/Tollerton

Plenty of Fish in the Sea by Stephen Foster/Cooper

The Swan (cello solo) by Camille Saint-Saens

Die Lorelei by Heine/Franz Liszt

Cantar do Alma  (Song of Love) by Federico Mompou

Cielo e mar (Sky and Sea -- La Gioconda) by Amilcare Ponchielli

Up a Lazy River by Carmichael/Arodin

Old Man River by Jerome Kern

Flow Gently, Sweet Afton (Traditional)

Sweet and Low by Tennyson/Barnby

Auf dem Strom by Schubert

Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea by Arlen/Koehler

Santa Lucia (Traditional)

La mer (Beyond the Sea) by Charles Trenet

Au fond du temple saint (from The Pearl Fishers) by Georges Bizet

L’invitation au Voyage (Invitation to a voyage) by Baudelaire/Henri Duparc

L’altra notte (from Mefistofele) by Arrigo Boito

Bali Hai (from South Pacific) by Rodgers & Hammerstein

Veleiro (Sails) by Hector Villa-Lobos

Down by the Old Mill Stream (Traditional)

Dames at Sea by Wise/Haimson/Miller

Oh Shenandoah (Traditional)


The One Hundred Sixteenth Concert

Thursday, July 13, 2006, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Gwyn Jones, flute

Rosanne Conway, piano

Bob Rosen and David Ehrlich, piano

Program:

Suite Antique by John Rutter (1945-)

I. Prelude - II. Ostinato - III. Aria - IV. Waltz - V. Chanson - VI. Rondeau

Theme and Variations by Aaron Copland (1900-90)

I. Flowing - II. Poetic, somewhat mournful - III. Lively, with bounce

I N T E R M I S S I O N

Waltzes for piano duo, op. 39, Nos. 1, 2, 4, 8, 10, 13, 15 by Johannes Brahms (1833-97)

Sonata for Flute and Piano, op. 94 by Serge Prokofiev (1891-1953)

I. Moderato - II. Scherzo - III. Andante - IV. Allegro con brio

About Our Artists

Gwyn Jones, a resident of Southwest since 1993, has been a frequent performer with SWCP since 2004. While her marketing position with the U.S. Green Building Council keeps her busy, Gwyn manages to find time to perform in various venues, including the American University and Friday Morning Music Club orchestras, and her own Zephyr Quintet. She currently is coached by Keith Bryan, professor emeritus of the University of Michigan. Gwyn achieved her Master of Music degree from Florida State University, where she studied with Charles Delaney. As a doctoral student and teaching fellow at the University of North Texas, Gwyn worked with Mary Karen Clardy and also indulged her taste for jazz. While working toward her Bachelor’s in English, she studied with Claire Durand-Racamato. Musical aficionados may also find Gwyn in pit orchestras for local theater companies like the Foundry Players and Little Theatre of Alexandria.

Hailed by critics for her "musical elegance and brilliant technique," Seattle native Rosanne Conway, performed with the Seattle Symphony at age 16. She holds degrees from the Universities of Washington and Colorado. Winner of the Petri Award for Foreign Study, she attended the Hochschule fur Musik und Theater in Hannover, Germany, and Mozarteum in Salzburg, Austria. In New York, she studied with Earl Wild at Juilliard. Rosanne has appeared on many local concert series as recitalist, chamber music player, and accompanist. She and duo piano partner Santiago Rodriguez performed together for the 1996 International William Kapell Competition for Piano and have recorded Rachmaninoff’s four hand/two piano works.

Currently on the faculty of the National Cathedral School and St. Alban’s, Robert Rosen began piano studies at age 7, not long before realizing that one must eat to live. Retired now from a career as attorney and CPA with Ernst & Young, Bob devotes his life to music. In addition to coordinating the Laropa Ensemble and conducting the Montrose Ensemble, he is director of public relations for the Friday Club and studies with Nancy Hallsted.

David Ehrlich learned the piano from his father, Richard, in Boston, starting at the age of six. Since discovering (at 7) he wasn't destined to be the next Horowitz, he's resigned himself to life as a musical amateur, studying with Matthew van Hoose and playing for friends in venues like Eugene, Ore.; New York City; and Nagydorog, Hungary.


Notes on the Program

Rutter’s Suite Antique was written in 1979 whenn he was asked to write a piece for the Cookham Festival, performed by Duke Dobing and the London Baroque Soloists in Cookham Parish Church. Since Bach's Brandenburg Concerto No.5 was on the program, he decided to write for the same combination of instruments – flute, harpsi-chord, and strings, in the form and style of Bach's day. He also wrote this evening’s piano reduction. The six movements range from a Bach-like aria to a Richard Rodgers-style waltz. Artfully juxtaposing the "old" with the "new," Rutter's own style comes through most clearly in the final two movements: the simple and plaintive chanson; and the rondeau with its characteristically forward-driving rhythms and beautiful melodic lines.

Copland’s Duo was composed on commission from a group of pupils and friends of the late Kincaid, for many years solo flutist of the Philadelphia Orchestra and considered to be the father of the Ameri-can school of flute playing. Although Copland studied in Paris with Nadia Boulanger, he used American folk music jazz, and serial tech-niques in his music. The duo draws on material from his sketchbooks of the 1940s, returning to the lyricism of Appalachian Spring . As a duo, the flute and piano engage in conversation-like fugues and intertwined passages throughout, from the elegiac opening movement through the playful and energetic third movement. The simple, direct melodies combined with intricate use of rhythm and meter mark this work as distinctly Copland.

We think these charming waltzes make a nice counterpoint to our flute recital. Writing them in 1865 and dedicating them to Viennese critic Eduard Hanslick, Brahms said, "Your name came up in spite of itself...I was thinking of Vienna, of the pretty girls with whom you play duets, of you who like such things, my friend, and what not..."

The Sonata in D was Prokofiev’s only work for flute, but one of the most important works in the flute repertoire. Prokofiev was a virtuoso pianist in addition to his obvious gifts as a composer. He entered the St. Petersburg Conservatory at 13, and at 19 made his first public appearance in St. Petersburg. Although the he traveled widely from 1918 to 1934, he found he missed his homeland terribly and returned to the Soviet Union, where he was considered a leading composer of the Soviet School. Ironically, in later years, his works, along with those of Shostakovich and Khatchaturian, would be removed from the Soviet repertory because of their "bourgeois formalism" -- no doubt due to his years abroad. The Sonata was written in the summer of 1941 after Prokofiev had been evacuated from Moscow to avoid the dangers of the German invasion. In the relative quiet, close to nature, he wrote a work that perhaps reflects the many emotions of those challenging times, from serene simplicity to witty to pensive and brooding to strong and passionate. Premiered in Moscow, 1943 at the height of Prokofiev’s popularity in the Soviet Union, this piece is a traditional work in form and in character reminiscent of the composer’s Classical Symphony and Love for Three Oranges.


The One Hundred Fifteenth Concert

Monday, June 12, 2006, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Jerry Schwarz, clarinet

Stephen Key, oboe

Alan Karnovitz, bassoon

Volker Treichel, horn

Graham Down, piano

Ramona Matthews and Michael Casassa, violin

Nicholas Fobe, viola

Allan Malmberg, cello

Thelma Leenhouts, soprano

Elizabeth Dyson, piano

Program:

Quintet for Piano and Winds, K. 452 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Clarinet Quintet, op. 115 by Johannes Brahms

Songs of Haydn, Pergolesi, Copland and Britten


The One Hundred Fourteenth Concert

Thursday, May 25, 2006, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Nayiri Poochikian, violin

Hoorig Poochikian, violin

Virginia Lum, piano

Program:

A mother/daughter team of consummate skill presents a program of bravura works of Sarasate and Brahms


The One Hundred Thirteenth Concert

Thursday, April 27, 2006, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Carol Hall, violin

Eliza Platts-Mills, cello

Visnja Kosanovic, flute

Tom Holman, saxophone

Jeanne Christ and David Ehrlich, piano

Program:

Suite in A minor for Flute by Georg Philip Telemann (1681-1767)

1. Ouverture. Lento - 2. Les plaisirs. Presto - 3. Air à l’italien - 4. Menuet 1,2 - 5. Passepied 1,2 - 6. Polonaise - 7. Réjouissance

Croquembouches (1926) by Claude Delvincourt (1888-1954 )

1. Plum Pudding - 2. Puits d’amour (Well of love) - 3. Nègre en chemise (Black in white shirt) - 4. Linzer tart (Linz tart) - 5. Grenadine - 6. Rahat loukhoum (Turkish delight)

I N T E R M I S S I O N

Trio in F major, op. 80 by Robert Schumann (1810-56)

1. Sehr lebhaft - 2. Mit innigem ausdruck - 3. In mässiger Bewegung - 4. Nicht zu rasch

About Our Artists:

Carol Hall was educated at Kansas State and the University of New Hampshire. A former faculty member of Phillips Exeter Academy, the University of New Hampshire, and VanderCook College of Music in Chicago, she conducted youth orchestras at the Music Center of the North Shore in Winnetka, Illinois. During 12 years in Brussels, she was a founding member of the International Chamber Players and plays now in the Dumbarton Chamber Ensemble.

As an eight-year-old growing up in the outskirts of London, Eliza Platts-Mills picked the cello, when a player came to her local school to show off the instrument. Since then, she’s played in Charlottesville, Boston, and here.

Visnja Kosanovic brings us her flute from Serbia, where she earned degrees at the Academy of Art in Novi Sad and was invited to study with Peter-Lukas Graf at the Summer Mozarteum in Salzburg. Since coming to Washington, she has joined the faculty of the Levine School of Music, played with SWCP frequently, and appeared with the National Gallery Orchestra. If that weren’t enough, she teaches yoga.

Tom Holman is a psychologist in Montgomery County who began studying classical and jazz saxophone at Oberlin and continues now joined the faculty of the Levine School of Music with Noah Getz.

David Ehrlich learned the piano from his father, Richard, in Boston, starting at the age of six. Since discovering (at 7) he wasn't destined to be the next Horowitz, he's resigned himself to life as a musical amateur, studying with Matthew van Hoose and playing for friends in venues like Eugene, Oregon; Tiburon, California; New York City; and Nagydorog, Hungary.


Notes on the Program

Telemann, Bach’s great North German precursor, was also largely a church organist who found many, many more uses for his music. Exceptionally prolific, he was well connected to the world of printing and publishing, so his music spread far and wide. Through this "network" he expanded his style further. Tonight’s suite of dance forms can be considered very civilized (and somewhat Frenchified) table music.

And speaking of Frenchified, the French adored Gershwin and the Jazz Age. But unwilling as they were to give all the glory to one not their own, the virtually unknown Claude Delvincourt had a wonderful time spoofing American pretensions, not to mention fancy desserts. WWI hero and secret member of the WWII Resistance, Delvincourt also distinguished himself as director of the Paris Conservatory during the Nazi occupation. Tom has delved deeply into M. Delvincourt’s life and persona, having even enjoyed dinner with the composer’s descendants, and he’ll lick his lips as he tells you what "croquembouches" are.

Whenever we program Robert Schumann’s music, we must of necessity dwell on the madness that overtook him at the end of his otherwise happy and productive musical life. Although this trio, written as he had begun his unfortunate descent, has little of the joyous optimism of most of the rest of his works, it has a brilliant pulsing energy that suffuses each of the movements. The piano has an unusually difficult part, often doubling the strings without over-powering them.


The One Hundred Twelfth Concert

Thursday, March 30, 2006, 7:30 p.m.

TENTH ANNUAL CHERRY BLOSSOM FESTIVAL CONCERT

Featuring:

Peggy Orchowski, violin

Eliza Platts-Mills, cello

Gwyn Jones and Visnja Kosanovic, flute

Nancy Sulfridge, clarinet

Rosemarie Ruiz Houghton, soprano

David Ehrlich, piano

Program:

Song Without Words, op. 109 by Felix Mendelssohn (1809-47)

Trio in D minor, op. 32 by Anton Arensky (1861-1906)

1. Allegro moderato - 2. Elegie: Adagio - 3. Allegro ma non troppo

I N T E R M I S S I O N

Der Hirt auf dem Felsen (The Shepherd on the Rock) by Franz Schubert (1797-1828)

Concerto for Two Flutes and Orchestra by Domenico Cimarosa (1749-1801)

1. Allegro vivo - 2. Lento - 3. Rondo: Vivace

About Our Artists

Peggy Orchowski is a California girl who's been playing in violin ensembles since she and her identical twin sister made up 2/3 of a trio with one of her mother's students at the age of seven. Since rediscovering the joy of making chamber music some 20 years ago, she's taken it to Prague, Corfu, Switzerland, and now here.

Eliza Platts-Mills picked the cello as an eight-year-old growing up in the outskirts of London, when a cellist came to her local school and showed off the instrument. Since then, she’s played in Charlottesville, Boston, and here, including a serendipitous piano trio with Matthew Van Hoose (David Ehrlich’s coach) many years ago.

Visnja Kosanovic brings us her flute from Serbia, where she earned degrees at the Academy of Art in Novi Sad and was invited to study with Peter-Lukas Graf at the Summer Mozarteum in Salzburg. Since coming to Washington, she has joined SWCP frequently and appeared with the National Gallery Orchestra, joined the faculty of the Levine School of Music, and made great strides in her skills at teaching yoga.

Gwyn Jones, a 12-year Southwest resident, enjoys being part of the Southwest Chamber Players. She takes time from her day job as communications services manager for the U.S. Green Building Council to perform with a range of ensembles: her own Zephyr Quintet, the Capital Wind Symphony, American University Symphony, and Columbia Flute Choir. A performing member of the Friday Morning Music Club, Gwyn holds a Master of Music in Performance from Florida State and was a teaching fellow at the University of North Texas, where her teachers included Claire Durand Racato, Charles Delaney, and Mary Karen Clardy. She studies with Keith Bryan of the University of Michigan.

Rosemarie Ruiz Houghton hails from Pittsburgh, where she sang with its Opera. Locally, she's sung with the National Symphony, does zarzuela with Coral Cantigas, a Latin American chamber choir, and teaches voice at Catholic and NVCC.

Nancy Sulfridge began her study of clarinet in 6th grade in Michigan and was introduced to chamber music in high school through membership in the Grosse Pointe Chamber Music Society and in college as a foreign student at the Friedrich Alexander Universität in Erlangen, Germany. After a long hiatus, she rediscovered chamber music while in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Currently, she is a member of the Pan American Symphony, and she and her husband are part of a chamber music performance class at George Washington. When not making music, she teaches adult education in Charles County, Md.

David Ehrlich learned the piano from his father, Richard, in Boston, starting at the age of six. Since discovering (at 7) he wasn't destined to be the next Horowitz, he's resigned himself to life as a musical amateur, studying with Matthew van Hoose and playing for friends in venues like Eugene, Oregon; Tiburon, California; New York City; and Nagydorog, Hungary.


Notes on the Program

Mendelssohn’s very name means "happy," and it’s no accident that many of his works for piano, accompanied or not, are as felicitous as this one, which is literally a wordless song.

Arensky was a Russian romantic whose short, colorful life included, sadly, much drinking and gambling, but also teaching the great Rachmaninoff at the Moscow Conservatory. Dated 1894, this ravishing trio has no specific program, though it’s easy to close the eyes and let the imagination roam. Maybe you’re in a lovely country dacha amid a stand of birch trees. Perhaps it’s a tribute to an eminent person who has just died. Or maybe it’s simply a stormy yet serious avowal of love. Enjoy ... we will!

Shortly before his death, Schubert traveled to Esterhazy, the burial place of Haydn. Though terminally ill at the time, he could not resist setting this charming song of a lonely shepherd who pines for his faraway love.

Once dubbed "the low-calorie Mozart," Cimarosa wrote an incredible four operas (of which "The Secret Marriage" is the best known) each year for ten years. He had the misfortune to be a Neapolitan, and a revolutionary one at that, which eventually cost him several years in prison. Also known as "Concertante," this very witty dialogue between the two flutes and orchestra includes two dazzling double cadenzas.


The One Hundred Eleventh Concert

Tuesday, January 31, 2006, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Marcia d’Arcangelo, Joyce Bouvier, Rosemarie Houghton, Thelma Leenhouts, soprano

Carolyn Zolbe, alto

John Turner, tenor

Jonathan Ward, baritone

Stephen Key, oboe

Jerry Schwarz clarinet

Jason Koczur, horn

Dilyana Kirova, bassoon

David Ehrlich, piano

Program (All-Mozart):

Variations on Mi caro Adone by Salieri, K. 180

Als Luise die Briefe ihre ungetreues Liebhabers verbrannt, K. 281

Quintet for Winds and Piano, K. 452

1. Largo. Allegro moderato - 2. Larghetto - 3. Allegretto

I N T E R M I S S I O N

Marriage of Figaro, K. 492

1. Voi che sapete - 2. Non più andrai - 3. Porgi amor - 4. Dove sono - 5. Sull’ aria - 6. Deh vieni, non tardar

Requiem, K. 626

1. Tuba mirum - 2. Recordare - 3. Benedictus - 4. Lacrymosa

Ave verum corpus, K. 618


The One Hundred Tenth Concert

Tuesday, January 24, 2006, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Marcia d’Arcangelo, Joyce Bouvier, soprano

Carolyn Zolbe, alto

John Turner, tenor

Jonathan Ward, baritone

Carol Hall, violin

Kathy Ferger, viola

Tom Blackburn and John Kaboff, cello

David Ehrlich, piano

Program (All-Mozart):

Arias from Don Giovanni, K. 527

Dalla sua pace - Vedrai, carino

Quartet for Piano and Strings, K. 478

1. Allegro - 2. Andante - 3. Rondo. Allegro

Requiem in D minor, K. 626 (excerpts)

Tuba mirum - Recordare - Benedictus - Lacrymosa

I N T E R M I S S I O N

Arias from Die Zauberflöte, K. 620

Die Vogelsänger bin ich - Bei männern - Ach, ich fülls - Papageno/Papagena

Sonata in A major for piano, K. 331

1. Tema con variazioni - 2. Menuetto - 3. Rondo alla turca

Ave verum corpus, K. 618


The One Hundred Ninth Concert

Sunday, January 15, 2006, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Cecilie Jones, Joyce Rizzolo, Jean Provine, violin

Robert Huesmann, Donald Maclean, viola

Brigitta Gruenther, Jan Timbers, cello

Wendi Hatton, clarinet

David Ehrlich, piano

Program (All-Mozart):

Sonata in F for violin and piano, K. 377

Tema con variazoni

Quintet for Strings in C, K. 515

1. Allegro - 2. Menuetto - 3. Andante - 4. Allegro

I N T E R M I S S I O N

Quintet for Clarinet and Strings, K. 581

1. Allegro - 2. Larghetto - 3. Tema con variazoni - 4. Allegretto

The One Hundred Eighth Concert

Tuesday, January 10, 2006, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Grace Boeringer, Steve Pershing, violins

Donald Maclean, viola

Emily Toll, cello

Visnja Kosanovic, flute

Rosemarie Houghton, soprano

David Ehrlich, piano

Program (All-Mozart):

Abendempfindung, K. 523

Duo for violin and viola in G, K. 423

1. Allegro - 2. Adagio - 3. Allegro

Trio for violin, cello, and piano, K. 564

1. Allegro - 2. Tema con variazoni - 3. Allegretto

I N T E R M I S S I O N

Dans un bois solitaire, K. 267

Zeffiretti lusinghieri (from "Idomeneo")

Concerto for flute and orchestra, K. 314

1. Allegro aperto - 2. Andante ma non troppo - 3. Allegro

Notes on the Program

Contrary to what one might think, "Abendempfindung" was not written in anticipation of the composer’s early death, but it is a lovely meditation on man’s worth and dignity.

Violin/viola duos and piano trios were the kind of home cham-ber music that Mozart often wrote for his friends, These two, despite their apparent simplicity, are remarkably sophisticated.

Ever a joker, Mozart enjoyed faintly sexual and/or "lavatorial" prattle in his lieder, and penned this somewhat incongruous one about Cupid while in Paris. Think ... Fragonard paintings!

"Idomeneo" not Mozart’s best known opera, was set in ancient Greece and distantly connected to the Trojan War; however, think of how Fragonard might have painted this scene!

The flute concerto, the most serious work on tonight’s program, was originally written for oboe, and described by Mozart himself as the oboist’s "perfect warhorse." This version, his also, is actu-ally pitched a tone higher to accommodate the flute’s brilliance.


The One Hundred Seventh Concert

Tuesday, December 20, 2005, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Joyce Bouvier, Rosemarie Houghton, Jonathan Ward, vocalists

Tom Blackburn, cello

Gwyn Jones, Atsuko Nakamura, flute

Jerry Schwarz, clarinet

Jason Koczur, horn

David Ehrlich, piano

Program (All-Mozart, Almost):

La ci darem and Deh vieni alla finestra (from "Don Giovanni," K. 527)

Andante, K. 315, and Rondo, K. 373, for Flute

An Chloe, K. 524, and Ridente la calma, K. 249 (lieder)

Concerto for Horn and Piano in E-flat major, K. 495

Andante from Clarinet Concerto, K. 622

Wachet auf from Cantata 140 and Flute Sonata in E minor, BWV 1034 by J.S. Bach

Serenade for Flute by Haydn

Two carols by John Joseph Niles

Assorted communal Christmas carols

An appearance by the Potomac Mandolin Ensemble


The One Hundred Sixth Concert

Thursday, November 17, 2005, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Matthew Van Hoose, piano

Tiffani Perry, clarinet

Noah Getz, saxophone

Program:

Piano Sonata, op. 109 by Ludwig van Beethoven

Bagatelles by Finzi

Pieces for Piano and Saxophone


The One Hundred Fifth Concert

Sunday, October 16, 2005, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

John Kaboff, cello

Program:

First, Fourth and Fifth Unaccompanied Cello Suites by J.S. Bach


The One Hundred Fourth Concert

Thursday, September 15, 2005, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Cecile Jones, violin

Ann Elizabeth Jones, soprano

Joyce Rizzolo, violin

Robert Huesmann, viola

Emily Toll, cello

Program:

Songs for Voice and Violin by Gustav Holst

Melancolie by Paul Hindemith

Songs on texts of A.E. Housman by Ralph Vaughan Williams

Three Poems of Langston Hughes by Smeetz

Suite for Voice and Violin by Hector Villa-Lobos


The One Hundred Third Concert

Thursday, August 18, 2005, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Beth Lawrence, soprano

Rosemarie Houghton, soprano

Joyce Bouvier, soprano

Jonathan Ward, baritone

Bruce Crane, baritone

Program:

Row, Row, Row Your Boat (Ensemble) (Traditional)

Dreamer’s Holiday (Bruce + Joyce) by Gannon/Wayne

I Dreamt I Dwelt in Marble Halls (from "The Bohemian Girl") (Beth) Michael Balfe

Doretta’s Song (from "La Rondiné") (Joyce) by Giacomo Puccini

Ein Traum (Jonathan) by Edvard Grieg

Cançao do amor (Paean of Love from the movie "Green Mansions) (Rosemarie) by Hector Villa-Lobos

Medley #1: It's the Same Old Dream (Cahn/Styne); Daydream (Ellington/Strayhorn); Did You Ever See a Dream Walking? (Gordon/Revel); All I Do is Dream of You (Freed/Brown)

Träumerei (Dreaming) (David) by Robert Schumann

Dichterliebe, #13-14 (Poet’s Songs) (Jonathan) by Schumann

Gretchen am Spinnräde (Gretchen at the Spinning-Wheel) (Beth) by Franz Schubert

Dream Dancing (Joyce) by Cole Porter

Medley #2: Deep in a Dream (DeLange/VanHeusen); Darn That Dream (DeLange/Van Heusen); This Time the Dream’s on Me (Mercer/Arlen)

Liebestraum (Love’s Dream) (David) by Franz Liszt

Oh Quand je dors (Oh! When I Sleep) (Rosemarie) by Liszt

I N T E R M I S S I O N

Final Alice (Beth) by David Del Tredici

Medley #3: You Stepped out of a Dream (Cahn/Brown); Meet me Tonight in Dreamland (Whitson/Friedman); Dream a Little Dream of Me (Kahn/Schwandet/Andree); Give Me a Kiss to Build a Dream On (Kalmer/ Ruby/Hammerstein); All I Have to do is Dream (Bryant)

Dream Lover (Beth) by Victor Scherzinger

Beautiful Dreamer (Beth + Jonathan) by Stephen Foster

I Dream of Jeannie (Jonathan) by Foster

Serenade (Jonathan + humming chorus) by Schubert

Die Traumbild (The Dream Image) (Rosemarie) by W.A. Mozart

Intorno all’ idol mio (All Around My Loce) (Beth) by Cesare Cesti

Medley #4: Laura (Mercer/Raksin); My Dreams are Getting Better All the Time (Curtis/Mizzy); A Dream is a Wish your Heart Makes (David/Hoffman/Livingston); Dream (Mercer)

Après une rêve (After a Dream) (Beth) by Gabriel Fauré

This Nearly was Mine (Bruce) by Rodgers & Hammerstein

Out of My Dreams (from "Oklahoma") (Rosemarie, Beth, Joyce) by Rodgers & Hammerstein

The Impossible Dream (Jonathan)

When I Grow Too Old to Dream (sing-along)


Notes on the Program

"A Field of Dreams" represents the yearning part of all of us. There are many kinds of dreams that do many strange things to dreamers. While most dreams are about...you guessed it -- LOVE -- they are night dreams, daydreams, nightmares, and just pipe dreams. At their best, dreams are the fulfillment of wishes -- aspirations of the best that can befall us; at worst, they can be the kind of destructive fantasies that can lead to disaster.


About Our Artists

We trust that tonight’s performers are familiar faces to our audiences: Beth, who labored for years at Madeira School as head of its dramatic arts program, dealing with girls not different from Gretchen; Rosemarie, opera singer and voice teacher; Jonathan, the head of the Washington Chorus; Joyce and Bruce, the very soul of St. Augustine’s Church; and David, who founded the series.


The One Hundred Second Concert

Thursday, July 21, 2005, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Dilyana Kirova, bassoon

Barbara Fitzgerald, double bass

Cecilie Jones, violin

Billie Anderton, viola

Jan Timbers, cello

Mariana Lima, horn

David Ehrlich, piano

Program:

Telemann: Canonic Sonata for Bass and Bassoon by Telemann

Romance in F by Beethoven

Suite for String Quartet by Hoffmeister

Grand Allegro for Bass and Piano by Dragonetti

Hungarian Rondo by Weber

Romance for Bassoon and Piano by Saint-Saens

Duo for Horn and Bassoon by Hindemith

Brasiliera for Bassoon and Piano by Milhaud


The One Hundred First Concert

Thursday, June 16, 2005, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Jerry Schwarz, clarinet

Carol Hall, violin

Kathy Ferger, viola

Tom Blackburn, cello

Beth Lawrence, soprano

Liz Dyson and Graham Down, piano

Program:

Pastoral by Arthur Bliss (1891-1975)

Four Characteristic Pieces by William Hurlstone (1876-1906)

1. Ballade - 2. Croon Song - 3. Intermezzo - 4. Scherzo

Sechs Deutsche Lieder, op. 103 by Louis Spohr (1784-1859)

Sei still, mein Herz, Zwiegesang, Sehnsucht, Wiegenlied, Das heimliche Lied, Wach auf

I N T E R M I S S I O N

Trio (1933) by Jean Françaix (1912-97)

1. Vivo - 2. Scherzo. Allegretto vivo - 3. Andante - 4. Rondo. Vivo

Three Pieces, op. 83 by Max Bruch (1838-1920)

2. Allegro con moto - 6. Nachtgesang. Andante con moto - 7. Scherzo. Allegro vivace ma non troppo

About Our Artists

Tom Blackburn studied with Carl Werner, Joseph Tonaur, and Pasquale ci Conto, but his principal teachers have been cellos made by unknown masters who posted other people's names in them. A member of the Geological Society of Washington and Hunt String Quartet, he’s been a frequent and welcome member of SWCP.

Graham Down, a graduate of King's College, Cambridge, and Christchurch, Oxford, is an associate of the Royal College of Music in organ performance. A past master of both math (Lawrenceville School), and fund-raising, he's currently master of music at Epiphany Church in Georgetown.

Elizabeth Dyson embarked on a second career as a chamber musician after 30 years of practicing law. She has accompanied classes at the Maryland Youth Ballet, Washington School of Ballet, and Dance Institute of Washington and taught ballet accompaniment at the Levine School.

Kathy Ferger, a long-time D.C. resident and commu-nity activist, grew up in upstate N.Y. She developed a love of chamber music at Kinhaven music camp and studied viola at Oberlin while majoring in political science. She played six years with the Washington Civic Symphony; currently she devotes her musical efforts to the Hunt Quartet and programs organized by Levine.

Carol Hall graduated from Kansas State and the University of New Hampshire. A former faculty member of Phillips Exeter, UNH, and Vanderhoof in Chicago, she conducted youth orchestras in Winnetka. During a 12-year hitch in Brussels, she was a founding member of the International Chamber Players.

Attention to detail and joy in making music are two things Elizabeth Lawrence used to share with students in her capacity as director of Madrigals at Madeira School. Veteran performer Beth holds a DMA from Peabody and masters from Illinois-Champaign. Among her special passions are Mozart symphonies, Jane Austen novels, and her dog Princess Sniffy.

Clarinetist and impresario extraordinary Jerry Schwarz began his musical studies in Los Angeles at age ten and was UC-Berkeley Symphony's principal clarinet. He served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Senegal and taught English at American University, broken by a year's Fulbright in Florence and Barcelona. An avid chamber musician (and father of two more), Jerry's appeared on nearly half of our SWCP programs since 1997 as well as founding the woodwind Trio con Brio and Focus Trio.


Notes on the Program

Arthur Bliss wrote this little piece, a genteel battle between the keys of C and D during military service in World War I.

William Hurlstone was a pupil of Charles Villiers Stanford, who wrote a wonderful clarinet sonata we did a few years ago. Alas, the poor fellow was dogged by poor health and died at 30. This short suite for clarinet has been compared to the late work of Brahms.

Louis Spohr appears to have been no one’s favorite. It seems this man who produced a vast and wide-ranging output for various forces was temperamentally unable to work with anyone. Yet the extraordinary beauty of these six songs has lingered far longer.

We have often performed the Bruch pieces for clarinet, viola, and piano, finding them more enjoyable with each reading. Though ethnic and gypsy-like in feeling, they were actually written by a Lutheran university professor who wished to leave behind some music for his young clarinet-playing son.

Françaix’s string trio dates from 1933, the last year until this one in which a Washington baseball team was in first place as late as June. Like the Nats, this composition achieves a great deal with limited material. First, a string trio is one of the lightest scores a composer can choose, and this one rarely uses the full force of massed double-stops, achieving instead the compositional equivalent of a series of one-run victories: neoclassical clarity, control, humor, and originality.


The One Hundredth Concert

Tuesday, May 24, 2005, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Gwyn Jones, flute

Edward Skidmore, double bass

Julian Masters, drums

Nancy Sulfridge, clarinet

Donald Maclean, viola

David Ehrlich, piano

Program:

"Kegelstatt" Trio, K. 492 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Sonata for Clarinet or Viola by Johannes Brahms

Suite for Flute and Jazz Piano by Claude Bolling


The Ninety-Ninth Concert

Thursday, April 28, 2005, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Jerry Schwarz, clarinet

Joyce Bouvier, soprano

David Ehrlich, piano

Anna Rákoczy, flute

Edita Vinnitskaya, piano

Program:

Hungarian Rhapsody #12 by Franz Liszt (1811-81)

Velia (from The Merry Widow) by Franz Lehár (1870-1948)

Moments Musicaux, op. 94 by Franz Schubert (1797-1828)

1. Moderato - 2. Andante - 3. Allegro moderato - 4. Moderato - 5. Allegro vivace - 6. Allegretto

Mimi’s Entrance (from La Bohème) by Giacomo Puccini (1858-1924)

Ebben? Ne andrò lontana (from La Wally) by Antonio Cataldi (1898-1952)

I N T E R M I S S I O N

Three Romances for Oboe, op. 94 by Robert Schumann (1810-56)

1. Moderate - 2. Simple, affectedly - 3. Not fast

Sonata for Violin and Piano, op. 13 by Gabriel Fauré (1857-1924)

1. Allegro molto - 2. Andante - 3. Scherzo. Allegro vivo - 4. Allegro quasi presto

About Our Artists

Edita Vinnitskaya comes to us with extraordinary credentials. Beginning as a gifted child in her native Armenia, she has won prizes galore, both in Russia and, since 1995, here. Her U.S. studies were under Santiago Rodriguez at the University of Maryland and Leon Fleisher at Peabody, and she’s been heard on stage in eight states.

Joyce Bouvier, who studied classical piano as a child and trained late in life in the classical vocal repertoire, is equally at home with the Great American Songbook. She is director of music at Saint Augustine’s.

David Ehrlich learned the piano from his father, Richard, in Boston, starting at the age of six. Since discovering (at 7) he wasn't destined to be the next Horowitz, he's resigned himself to life as a musical amateur, studying with Matthew van Hoose and playing for friends in Eugene, Ore.; Tiburon, Cal.; New York City; and Nagydorog, Hungary.

Jerry Schwarz, clarinetist, impresario, and occasional song ‘n’ dance man, began his musical studies in Los Angeles at age ten and hasn’t stopped since. An avid chamber musician (and father of two more), Jerry's founded two woodwind trios and appeared on nearly half of our SWCP programs since 1997.

The bearer of an illustrious Hungarian name, Anna Rákoczy followed the steps of maany famous countrymen to the Franz Liszt Academy in Budapest, receiving the highest musical scholarship in the land. Since moving here in 2002 with a Fulbright at Peabody, she has continued to win honors. In her spare time, Anna is also a gifted painter and tapestrymaker.


Notes on the Program

These charming miniatures are classic Schubert. Wonderfully melodious yet surprisingly tricky technically, they have challenged young pianists for 200 years. We can have little doubt that the composer of "Guys and Dolls" had to play the last of the six as a child!

Actually written for oboe, the Schumann romances work on almost any instrument. Joyous and immensely musical, they come from one of the happiest times in the composer’s difficult life, and speak for a soul that loved and revered beauty though he found precious little in his life.

While the three arias we present this evening are quite familiar to opera lovers everywhere, the last one is of unusual interest because it was the constant leitmotif of the Hollywood movie Diva.

The words "Liszt, Hungarian, and Rhapsody" are nearly synonymous. The great pianist Liszt, though he made his living abroad, reached back to his homeland to pluck these magnificent Gypsy-like melodies.

Gabriel Fauré is a man we play often. The highly sophisticated harmonies and lush melodies for which this elegant Frenchman is justly adored are nowhere more evident than in this magnificent sonata originally written for violin. From the great upward rush of the line at the beginning through the tender Andante, it positively soars. Of particular note is the devilish scherzo, which leaves the flutist very little chance to breathe. And the 6/8 finale is a romp from beginning to end.


The Ninety-Eighth Concert

Thursday, March 31, 2005, 7:30 p.m.

OUR ANNUAL SALUTE TO THE CHERRY BLOSSOMS

Featuring:

Ryan ONeil, cello

Visnja Kosanovic, flute

Beth Lawrence, soprano

Jerry Schwarz, clarinet

Cecilie Jones, violin

David Ehrlich, piano

Program:

Piano Trio, K.502 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Cello Sonata #1 by Ludwig van Beethoven

The Shepherd on the Rock by Franz Schubert

Ballade by Périlhou


The Ninety-Seventh Concert

Tuesday, February 22, 2005, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Cecilie Jones & Joyce Rizzolo, violins

Robert Huesmann, viola

Jan Timbers, cello

Mary K. Traver, piano

Program:

Theme and Variations (from String Quartet in A minor, op. 35a) by Arensky

Trio for Piano, Violin et Violoncello by Maurice Ravel

Quartet #2 in a A minor, op.51, #2 by Johannes Brahms


The Ninety-Sixth Concert

Thursday, February 3, 2005, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Gwyn Jones, flute

Rosanne Conway, piano

Program:

Sonata by Johann Sebastian Bach

Adagio, Rondo by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Works of Fauré, Godard, Ravel and more


The Ninety-Fifth Concert

Wednesday, December 22, 2004, 7:30 p.m.

MERRY CHRISTMAS!

Featuring:

Edwina Chen, soprano

Catherine Justice, soprano

Beth Lawrence, soprano

Rosemarie Houghton, soprano

Joyce Bouvier, soprano

Ryan O’Neil, cello

Gwyn Jones, Martha Jarvis, flutes

Don McLean, viola

David Ehrlich, piano

The Potomac Mandolin Ensemble:
Lynn Falk, mandolin; Annette Henzke, mandolin; Pat Kibler, mandola; Hoang Le, guitar; Edith Pötzschke, mandolin

Program:

Adeste Fideles (Traditional)

Sonata for Flute and Cembalo in A minor by G.F. Handel (1685-1759)

Larghetto - Allegro - Siciliano - Alla breve

I Know that My Redeemer Liveth (from Messiah) by G. F. Handel

Epiphanias by Hugo Wolf (1860-1904)

Song Without Words, op. 109 by Felix Mendelssohn (1809-47)

The Christmas Rose by P.I. Tchaikowsky (1841-93)

Lo How a Rose by Michael Praetorius (1571-1621)

A Lute Carol by Mary Caldwell

An Old Carol by Roger Quilter

Velvet Shoes by Randall Thompson

Marias Wiegenlied by Max Reger

Hark the Herald Angels Sing by Mendelssohn

Variations on "Ah, vous dirai-je, maman," K. 265 by W.A. Mozart/Franz Schmidt

INTERMISSION

Minuet (from Rodelinda) by G .F. Handel

Song of the Seashore (Andante) by Narita

Variations on Die Forelle (Quintet) by Franz Schubert (1797-1828)

Marieta by Francisco Tarrega

Coverdale’s Carol (Traditional)

Carol of the Bells by Leontovich

THE POTOMAC MANDOLIN ENSEMBLE

O Little Town of Bethlehem (arr. Lewis Redner/Phillips Brooks)

The Small Christmas Tree by Michael Head

Still, Still, Still (Traditional Austrian, arr. P. Ledger)

Le sommeil de l’enfant Jésus by Henri Büsser (1872-1973)

In the Deep Midwinter (arr. Christina Rossetti/Gustav Holst)

O Holy Night (arr. Adolphe Adam)


The Ninety-Fourth Concert

Thursday, November 11, 2004, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Visnja Kosanovic and Mariko Suzuki, flute

Ryan O'Neil, cello

Beth Lawrence, soprano

David Ehrlich, piano

Program:

The Flute of Pan by Mouquet

Cantique by Fauré

Song Cycle "Frauenliebe und Leben" by Schumann

Piano Sonata in C# Minor (Clair de Lune) by Beethoven


The Ninety-Third Concert

Tuesday, September 21, 2004, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Sarah Weiner, oboe

Jason Koczur, horn

Beth Lawrence, soprano

Bernie Arons, clarinet

Earle Silber, flute

Barbara Levin, piano

David Ehrlich, piano

Program:

Trio in A minor for Flute, Clarinet, Keyboard by Carl Philip Emmanuel Bach (1714-87)

1. Andantino - 2. Largo é sostenuto - 3. Allegro assai

Songs for Soprano, Horn, and Piano by Franz Lachner (1803-90)

Nachts in der Kajüte, op. 34 (Nights in the Ship’s Cabin)
Waldvöglein, op 28. #1 (The Little Wood Bird)
Frauenliebe und Leben, op. 39 (The Loves and Lives of Women)

Five Bagatelles for Clarinet and Piano by Gerald Finzi (1901-56 )

1. Prelude - 2. Romance - 3. Carol - 4. Forlane - 5. Fughetta

Trio for Oboe, Horn, and Piano, op. 265 by Carl Reinecke (1824-1910)

1. Allegro moderato - 2. Scherzo - 3. Adagio - 4. Allegro ma non troppo

About Us

Bernie “Berndog” Arons  and the clarinet go back to the Cleveland Heights High School orchestra, where he won renown for his marching gait and steady rhythm despite Lake Erie winds. Leaving a musical career in reserve he pursued liberal arts at Oberlin, then medical studies which led him to St. Elizabeth’s Hospital.  Inspired by a chance evening offer of fame from David Ehrlich, he picked up his instrument, warmed up the embouchure and fingers, and the rest, as they say, is ..... almost history.

Jason Koczur, a Northern Virginian, studied with the NSO’s Edwin Thayer and at Boston University with Eric Ruske, Sam Pilafian, and Richard Menaul. After graduating with a Bachelors in horn performance, he went to London to work with Michael Thompson and Richard Watkins at the Royal Academy of Music. Currently  assistant principal horn in Allentown (Pa.), he’s also with the Fairfax Symphony. Besides freelancing, he teaches privately and at NOVA.

Attention to detail and joy in making music are two things Elizabeth Lawrence uses to share with students in her capacity as director of the Dramatic Arts program at Madeira School. Veteran performer Beth holds a DMA from Peabody and masters from Illinois-Champaign. Among her special passions are Mozart symphonies, Jane Austen novels, and her dog Princess Sniffy.

Barbara Levin began piano as a young girl in Detroit with Mischa Kottler. She entered the University of Michigan as a piano major, but switched to mathematics, but continued her musical studies, discovering a love of chamber music. Graduate school, family obligations, law school, and work distractions delayed her musical ambitions until, having declared herself retired from work, she resumed piano studies again. Tonight she makes her Washington chamber music debut with a couple of psychiatrists who graciously refrain from trying to analyze her off-again-on-again musical career.

Earle Silber's rather erratic musical career began in Baltimore where, even on cold days, he played a hot saxophone.  Forced to put music aside for medicine, the sax went back in its case, but in the years following medical school, training and psychoanalysis, he took up the recorder and then the flute.  Partially retired now, Earle devotes less time to practicing psychiatry and more to practicing scales and, making up for lost time, he now marches to his own flute as he pursues the art of chamber music.

David Ehrlich learned the piano from his father, Richard, in Boston, starting at the age of six. Since discovering (at seven) that he wasn’t destined to be the next Horowitz,  he’s resigned himself to being a musical amateur, studying in Chapel Hill with Contrasts and here with Matthew van Hoose, and playing in such venues as Eugene, Oregon.; Tiburon, California.; Milton, Mass..New York City, and Nagydorog, Hungary.


Notes on the Program

Most of the 20 children of J.S. Bach were musicians, and C.P.E. is arguably the most successful. An entrepreneur, keeper of his father’s flame, and prolific composer in his own right, C.P.E. programmed very imaginatively, setting the stage for Mozart. Tonight’s trio represents the way he pushed orthodox instrumental combinations to the limit.

Franz Lachner, best-known of a large musical family, lived in Vienna and then Munich. He wrote a lot of music that in the opinion of many, was pleasant enough, but lacked “divine fire.” But he learned from his good friend Franz Schubert that “as long as you choose good poets for your song lyrics, people will listen to your music, too.”

Born in Italy but a leader in the 20th-century return to truly English music, apple grower Gerald Finzi wrote much for the Anglican Church, but is better known for the music he composed for the 1952 coronation of Queen Elizabeth II. These charming bagatelles are imaginative settings of medieval musical forms.

Carl Reinecke had the misfortune of living in the Germany of Liszt and Brahms, and being overshadowed by them. His very large oeuvre spans nearly every musical genre. Tonight’s trio is, in fact, the classic teaching piece for its odd instrumental combination, and one that works surprisingly well. The adagio is unusually gorgeous, and the finale, which we admit that we play too slowly, is a delightful peasant dance.


The Ninety-Second Concert

Thursday, August 26, 2004, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Rosemarie Houghton, Beth Lawrence and Joyce Bouvier, sopranos

Jonathan Ward and Bruce Crane, baritones

David Ehrlich and Bob Rosen, piano

Take Ariga, cello

Jerry Schwarz, clarinet

Program:

Music by Haydn, Beethoven, Schubert, Wagner, Holst, Berlin, Argento and more


The Ninety-First Concert

Tuesday, July 20, 2004, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Gwyn Jones, flute

Rosanne Conway, piano

Program:

Sonatine by Jean Rivier (1896-1987)

Allegro moderato - Lento affetuoso - Presto jocando

Conversation by John La Montaine (1920–)

Encounter - Dispute - Affections - Word Games

Suite Modale by Ernest Bloch (1880-1959)

Moderato - L’istesso tempo - Allegro giocoso - Adagio; Allegro deciso

Sonata by Jindrich Feld (1925 –)

Allegro giocoso - Grave - Allegro vivace

About Our Artists

Gwyn Jones, a 10-years-plus resident of Southwest, is excited to be part of the Southwest Chamber Players, where she can share her music with her own neighborhood. Gwyn takes time from her day job as marketing manager for SmithGroup, the area's largest architecture firm, to perform with a range of ensembles: her own Zephyr Quintet, the Capital Wind Symphony, the American University Symphony, and the Columbia Flute Choir, as well as various other freelance engagements. She was a soloist with the Sandy Springs Chamber Orchestra in Atlanta, where she also served as principal flute, and performed in numerous solo recitals. A new performing member of the Friday Morning Music Club, Gwyn holds a Master of Music in Performance from Florida State and was a teaching fellow at the University of North Texas, where she also conducted the UNT flute choir. Her teachers included Claire Durand Racamato, Charles Delaney, and Mary Karen Clardy. She currently studies with Keith Bryan, professor emeritus at the University of Michigan.

Hailed by critics for her musical elegance and brilliant technique, Rosanne Conway hails from Seattle, where she performed with the Symphony at 16. Holder of degrees from the universities of Washington and Colorado and winner of the Petri Award for Foreign Study, she attended the Hochschule fur Musik und Theater in Hannover, Germany, and the Mozarteum in Salzburg. While perhaps her most influential teacher was her grandmother, who introduced her to the piano at a very young age, she studied at Juilliard with Earl Wild. Rosanne has appeared on many local and regional concert series as recitalist, chamber musician, and accompanist. She joined the great Santiago Rodriguez in dual performance for the 1996 International William Kapell Competition. Their recording of Rachmaninoff's four-hand/two-piano works is scheduled to be released on the ELAN label. Currently on the faculty of National Cathedral School and St. Albans, she also maintains a private studio.


Notes on the Program

Paris Conservatory graduate Rivier's typically tonal musical oeuvre has an unmistakably French quality. It demonstrates his interest in classical ideas of form, structure and proportion. His style is characterized by such impressionist and 20th century techniques as modality, parallelism, extreme dynamics, intricate rhythms, and intensely contrasting moods. After WWII, he taught at his alma mater, composing over 200 works in numerous genres. The sonatine, composed in 1941 and dedicated to his father, an accomplished amateur flutist, was among his first works for flute, but one of the best. Each of the three movements, performed "enchainées," or attached, expresses a different character, but the overall mood is decidedly jovial and upbeat. It was premiered on French Radio by Jean-Pierre Rampal.

Illinois-born John La Montaine showed early promise of genius, studying with Howard Hansen at Eastman and Nadia Boulanger in Paris, who encouraged him to try composition. But recognizing the economic hardship of trying to be a full-time composer, he studied to become a stockbroker. Ironically, the day he passed his licensure exam, a call from the Pulitzer committee informed him that he would receive the Pulitzer Prize for his concerto for piano and orchestra, opus 9. Subsequently, he was a pianist with the NBC Symphony Orchestra under Toscanini and taught at Eastman. where he wrote the first work commissioned to honor John F. Kennedy.

The "Conversations" were written to be performed by a variety of instruments with piano, each taking advantage of each instrument’s particular physical and expressive qualities. These began with a clarinet version, followed by the violin, trombone, marimba, and viola. He is said to have liked tonight’s version best. It uses a consonant twelve-tone technique, creating motives and themes that recur throughout yet take on the character of the individual movements.

Swiss-born Ernest Bloch settled in the U.S. in 1916 and became a fixture in Eugene, Oregon. He is known primarily for his works in the Jewish tradition, and his orientation became primarily neoclassic. "It is the Jewish soul that interests me, the complex, glowing, agitated soul that I feel vibrating throughout the Bible … It is this that I strive to hear in myself and to translate in my music—the sacred emotion of the race that slumbers deep in our soul." His Suite Modale, composed in 1956, was originally for flute and piano but was later transcribed by the composer for flute and string orchestra.

Music couldn’t help but permeate Feld’s childhood as the son of a violinist and a professor of violin at the Prague Conservatory. Although he studied violin and viola performance with his father and enjoyed chamber music, his lifelong interest has been composition. Graduating with twin degrees in composition and musicology from the Prague Conservatory and Charles University in the late 1950s, his compositions began to attract considerable international attention, and he has since received numerous commissions. As his music was gradually performed in many musical centers of the world, his contacts with Czech and foreign musicians often motivated him to write new works for them. Such a piece iis his sonata from 1956, dedicated to the late, great Jean-Pierre Rampal. Brilliant and lyrical, it’s largely undiscovered by American flutists. While he draws from all of European music, his works have unmistakable Czech roots. A Czech critic once wrote of Feld: "He is at his best in compositions which give full scope to his talent for playful, bright and carefully chiseled music."


The Ninetieth Concert

Thursday, June 17, 2004, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Jerry Schwarz, clarinet

Carol Hall, violin

Nicholas Fobe and Kathy Ferger, violas

Tom Blackburn, violoncello

Michael Rohrer, bass

Jason Koczur, horn

Alan Karnowitz, bassoon

Liz Dixon and Bob Rosen, pianos

Program:

Fantasy Pieces for clarinet and piano, op. 73 by Robert Schumann

Trio for clarinet, viola and piano by Hartmann

Septet by Beethoven


The Eighty-Ninth Concert

Thursday, May 20, 2004, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Cecile Jones and Joyce Rizzolo, violin

Robert Huesmann, viola

Jan Timbers, cello

Mary Kay Traver, piano

Program:

Trio in E minor, op.67 by Dmitri Shostakovich (1906-75)

Andante - Allegro non troppo - Largo - Allegretto

Lament for Two Violas by Frank Bridge (1879-1941)

INTERMISSION

Quartet in C minor, op. 51, #1 by Johannes Brahms (1833-97)

Allegro Romanze. Poco adagio. Allegretto molto moderato e commodo. Finale. Allegro

Our Artists

Of her musical performing life, Southwester Cecilie Jones says, "It has happily included all sorts of music, from symphony and opera to bluegrass and Broadway, and as a Foreign Service spouse, even in a few countries in Europe and the Middle East. But since discovering chamber music as a young adult, it has been my favorite. As a student in California, I studied with Elizabeth Kincaid, and as an adult, with Mark Gottlieb, once of the Claremont Quartet and at that time concertmaster of the Kansas City Philharmonic."

New Yorker Joyce Rizzolo studied violin with Imre Pogany of the N.Y. Philharmonic and Emil Hauser, founder of the Budapest Quartet. She has performed with the Phoenix and Charleston (S.C.) Symphonies, and been in the Kennedy Center and Filene Center orchestras. Since moving here in 2000, she has begun to discover the rewards of playing chamber music with friends and colleagues.

Robert Huesmann studied violin as a youth and more recently, viola and chamber music with Miles Hoffman. A retired Foreign Service Officer, he played a good deal during overseas assignments with USAID. Since retiring to Washington, he has joined the Friday Morning Music Club and Rock Creek Chamber Players, and appears occasionally with the Southwest Chamber Players.

Jan Timbers earned her B.A. at Carnegie-Mellon, under Theo Salzman and Michael Grebanier, studying summers in Philadelphia with Samuel Mays. After college, she spent a year at the Swiss Institut de Hautes Etudes Musicales, and went on to earn a diploma from the Salzburg Mozarteum under the tutelage of Heidi Litschauer. Today she performs frequently in Europe, Canada, and the United States.


Notes on the Program

This trio, written in 1944, was dedicated to Ivan Smolettinsky, a close friend of the composer who died young. Another friend described the entire first movement as "a calm, clear picture of everyday Russian life. The Slavic folk tunes, alternatively gay and elegiac, build to a huge climax and then die away." The energetic second movement precedes the last two, both of which are connected with the young man’s death; the largo being a threnody, the finale a series of frenetic dances inspired possibly by current news accounts of Nazi treatment of Jewish prisoners.

Each time we do a work of Brahms, we mention his concern and discomfort with having "inherited Beethoven’s mantle." The fact he didn’t bring this quartet out for 20 years exemplifies his reticence. From heroic ascending opening theme to agitato coda, the first movement is the Brahms we know and love. The pensive romance might be considered a song without words. It is the third movement that attracts much of the attention.The charming intermezzo melody is accompanied on the second fiddle which plays the same note on different strings, producing a tonal effect like that of a jazz trumpeter using a wah-wah mute.


The Eighty-Eighth Concert

Thursday, April 22, 2004, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

John Kaboff, cello

Steve Pershing and Jeff Parry, violins

Cecilie Jones, viola

Emily Toll, cello

Jean-François Besgond, clarinet

Diane Winter-Pyles, piano

Program:

String Quartet, op. 13 by Felix Mendelssohn

Fifth Cello Suite by J. S. Bach

Clarinet Trio, op. 11 by Ludwig van Beethoven


The Eighty-Seventh Concert

Thursday, April 1, 2004, 7:30 p.m.

April Fools and Cherry Blossoms

Featuring:

Visnja Kosanovic, flute

Beth Lawrence, soprano

Jason Kocsur, horn

Peggy Orchoswski, violin

Jaap van Wesel, viola

Emily Toll, cello

David Ehrlich, piano

Program:

Sonata for Flute and Piano, op. 94 by Serge Prokofiev (1891-1953)

Moderato • Scherzo: Presto • Andante • Allegro con brio

Alphorn (1876) by Richard Strauss (1864-1949)

Waldhornruf by Franz Lachner (1803-90)

Le Jeune Pâtre Breton by Hector Berlioz (1803-69)

INTERMISSION

Quartet for Piano and Strings by Robert Schumann (1810-56)

Allegro ma non troppo • Scherzo: Molto vivace • Andante cantabile • Finale: Vivace

About Our Artists:

Jason Koczur, a Northern Virginian, studied with Edwin Thayer and Jeff Bianchi. He attended Boston University where he studied with Eric Ruske, Sam Pilafian, and Richard Menaul. Afterr graduating with a Bachelors in horn performance, he went to London to work with Michael Thompson and Richard Watkins at the Royal Academy of Music. Currently he is assistant principal horn in Allentown (Pa.), and plays with the Fairfax Symphony. In addition to free-lancing, he teaches privately and at NOVA.

Visnja Kosanovic brings us her flute from Serbia, where she earned degrees at the Academy of Art in Novi Sad before being invited to study with Peter-Lukas Graf at the Summer Mozarteum in Salzburg. Since coming here, she's appeared frequently with the National Gallery Orchestra, and has developed her twin interests in flute teaching and yoga.

Attention to detail and joy in making music are two things Elizabeth Lawrence shares with students in her capacity as director of Madrigals at Madeira School. A veteran performer, Beth holds a DMA from Peabody and masters from Illinois-Champaign. Among her special passions are Mozart symphonies, Jane Austen novels, and her dog Princess Sniffy.

Peggy Orchowski is a California girl who's been playing in violin ensembles since she and her identical twin sister made up 2/3 of a trio with one of her mother's students at the age of seven. Since rediscovering the joy of making chamber music some 20 years ago, she's taken it to Prague, Corfu, Switzerland, and now here.

The versatile Jaap van Wesel started early on the violin, adding the viola while at Amsterdam University due to a severe shortage of good violists, and playing either as required. In real life, he reports for Dutch and Israeli media.

Emily Toll has recently moved here from New York, where she worked for the United Nations when not playing the cello. In the few short months she’s been here, though, she has managed to find her niche in the amateur chamber estabishment very rapidly. She will play for us with a string quartet including her husband Steve later this month.

David Ehrlich learned the piano from his father, Richard, in Boston, starting at the age of six. Since discovering (at 7) he wasn't destined to be the next Horowitz, he's resigned himself to life as a musical amateur, studying with Matthew van Hoose and playing for friends in venues like Eugene, Ore.; Tiburon, Cal.; New York City; and Nagydorog, Hungary.


Notes on the Program:

The Prokofiev sonata is an extraordinarily beautiful work that can be played on either flute or violin. It’s probably the most difficult work Visnja and David have yet undertaken. Written relatively late in the composer’s life, he was still more or less under the thumb of his nemesis Josef Stalin. The deal he made was that his chamber music would be left essentially as he wrote it, with the proviso that it could only be played privately, and never published. With that thin guarantee of security, the composer set out to satirize the communist bureaucracy, and he really skewered it. It was not the tall, angular harmonies of the opening movement, nor the moonlight mood of the Andante nor the jolly sleigh-ride finale whose messages were transparently clear, where he risked the wrath of his masters. No - it was the slap-dash second-movement scherzo, which depicts the feckless bureaucracy rushing aimlessly to and fro never achieving anything. The fabulous sonorities of this wonderful piece may perhaps take some adjusting to, and it should be heard repeatedly to absorb the magnificent musical ideas - the more it’s heard, the more it grows on one. No kidding!

Ever since we three performed Schubert’s Auf dem Strom some years ago, Jason has been seeking out more songs for soprano with horn and piano. Look what he’s found!!!

And then we come to Schumann. Those of you who were with us a year ago heard his magnificent Quintet for piano and strings. Here is its sister - a quartet written more or less contemporaneously. The same joyful romantic melodies, the same ravishingly euphonious harmonies, especially the romantic third movement, which is simply to die for. Notice that the cellist must surreptitiously retune her lowest string in mid-movement to provide a low B-flat pedal point for the movement’s last six measures.


The Eighty-Sixth Concert

Tuesday, February 24, 2004, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Jean Provine, violin

Donald Maclean, viola

Jerry Schwarz, clarinet

Bob Rosen, Nicole Bordes, Sarah Himmelfarb and David Ehrlich, piano

Program:

Hungarian Dances by Johannes Brahms (1833-97)

#1 (Allegro molto) - #3 (Allegretto) - #2 (Allegro non assai)

Sinfonia Concertante in E-flat, K. 364 by W.A. Mozart (1756-91)

1. Allegro maestoso - 2. Andante - 3. Presto

I N T E R M I S S I O N

Hungarian Dances by Brahms

#11 (Poco andante) - #20 (Poco allegretto) - #17 (Andantino)

Three Pieces from op. 83 by Max Bruch (1858-1920)

2. Allegro con moto - 3. Andante con moto - 5. Romanian Melody

Hungarian Dances by Brahms

#6 (Vivace) - #7 (Allegretto) - #8 (Presto)

About Our Artists

Jean Provine studied violin at Boston University where she received her Masters degree, and spent several further years in the Boston area teaching and playing. She has played with the Seoul Philharmonic in Korea and the Durham Sinfonia in England where she spent 23 years playing, teaching Suzuki violin and raising a family. She is an avid player of chamber music and teaches in her home in College Park.

Don Maclean began his musical studies at age 17, and is a graduate of Oberlin. He believes that chamber music is "an example of how the world might someday operate ..... people of every race, age, gender and ethnicity cooperating to create something beautiful."

Robert Rosen began piano studies at age 7, not long before realizing that one must eat to live. Retired now from a career as attorney and CPA with Ernst & Young, Bob devotes his life to music. In addition to coordinating Laropa and conducting the Montrose Ensemble, he is director of public relations for the Friday Club and studies with Nancy Hallsted.

Clarinetist and impresario Jerry Schwarz began at least some of his musical studies in Los Angeles at age ten and became UC-Berkeley Symphony's principal clarinet. Also a member of the Rock Creek Wind Players and founder of the Trio Con Brio, Jerry is a frequently welcome fixture in many of our concert programs.

Nicole Bordes is French. She started piano at 6 at the Conservatoire of Toulouse, in the southwest of France, completed them in the École Normale Superieure de Musique of Paris. She then returned to Tou-louse to teach piano and theory. During these years, she enjoyed conducting a small orchestra and choirs of children. In 1989, she followed her husband around the world. After India, stints in Japan, Germany and England she has now settled in Washington, where she shares time between her two passions: her family and music.

Sarah Himmelfarb has been playing piano since the age of five. She has fond childhood memories of her mother’s living-room get-together, and in looking back on such later adventures as college and law school, she finds all the high points stem from chamber music. Since moving to Washington with her French horn manqué husband, she works part-time, raises three children, and ... plays chamber music.

David Ehrlich learned the piano from his father, Richard, in Boston, starting at the age of six. Since discovering (at 7) he wasn't destined to be the next Horowitz, he's resigned himself to life as a musical amateur, studying with Matthew van Hoose and playing for friends in venues like Eugene, Ore.; Tiburon, Cal.; New York City; and Nagydorog, Hungary.


Notes on the Program

The symphonie concertante was an early form of concerto. This one, for violin, viola, and orchestra (here reduced to piano) was presumably composed between 1776 and 1780. There is no indication why Mozart wrote a concerto for these instruments other than that he had a particular liking for the viola, which he himself played in chamber music performances. This profound, passionate work ranks with his greatest. Also, the orchestra part is of symphonic character rather than being a mere concerto accompaniment. The first movement is in classic three-part sonata-allegro form, ending in a delightful rondo.

Max Bruch was a professor at the University of Breslau. His eight pieces, which we've performed variously and complete tonight, were conceived originally for piano solo. However, he rescored them for his son when he showed promise on the clarinet. The work of a 70-year-old Lutheran writing on the eve of the Jazz Age, they're a romantic throwback to the 19th century, evoking as they do the vanished world of Eastern European Jewry.

There are twenty-one of Brahms’s wonderful Hungarian dances that he based on folk tunes, setting an inimitable big-city stamp on them. Evidently he didn’t think enough of them to give them opus numbers, but like the Liebeslieder that we’ve done the last few years, they earned him an awful lot of money. Performed either one by one or as a concerted set, they never fail to arouse an audience.


The Eighty-Fifth Concert

Thursday, January 15, 2004, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

The Ironwood Recorder Ensemble

Program:

A program of old and new, employing at least 25 instruments


The Eighty-Fourth Concert

Thursday, December 18, 2003, 7:30 p.m.

MERRY CHRISTMAS!

Featuring:

Beth Lawrence, soprano

Joyce Bouvier, soprano

Sarah Wagner, oboe

Bernie Arons, clarinet

Donald Maclean, viola

Jenny Lee, cello

David Ehrlich, piano

and the POTOMAC MANDOLIN ENSEMBLE

Lynn Falk, Annette Henzke, Edith Potzschke, mandolins; Pat Kibler, mandola; Hoang Le, guitar

Program:

Prelude: Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme (Cantata 140) by J.S. Bach, arr. Kocsis

Flösst mein Heiland (Christmas Oratorio) by J.S. Bach

He Shall Feed his Flock (Messiah) by G.F. Handel

Adeste Fideles (Traditional)

Ich esse den Brot (Cantata 84) by J.S. Bach

Laudamus Te (Gloria) by Antonio Vivaldi

Geistliche Wiegenlied, op. 91, # 2 by Johannes Brahms

Joseph lieber, Joseph mein (Traditional)

Gretchen am Spinneräde by Franz Schubert

In the bleak midwinter Christina by Rossetti/Gustav Holst

Hark the Herald Angels Sing by Felix Mendelssohn

INTERMISSION

Gavotte by G.F.Handel

Concerto in G major by Johann Hasse

Spanish Dance #5 (Guitar solo) by Enrique Granados

Carol of the Bells by Leontovich

O Tannenbaum (German folksong)

Five Greek Songs by Maurice Ravel

L’aïo de rósó (Songs of the Auvergne) by Joseph Canteloube de Malaret

Pavane pour un enfant by Maurice Ravel

O little town of Bethlehem by Phillips Brooks/Lewis Redner

Lo How a Rose (Traditional)

O Holy Night by Adolphe Adam


The Eighty-Third Concert

Tuesday, November 11, 2003, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

The Montrose Ensemble

(eleven-member wind and string ensemble)

Bob Rosen, piano

Program:

Gran Partita, K. 361 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Serenade, op. 44 by Antonin Dvorak

Rhapsody in Blue for solo piano by George Gershwin


The Eighty-First and Eighty-Second Concerts

Friday, October 31, 2003, 7:30 p.m.
Sunday, November 2, 2003, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

A Weekend of CONTRASTS

(the renowned European ensemble that launched our series seven years ago)

Kati Sebestyen, violin

Erwin Schiffer, viola

Freddy Arteel, clarinet

Dana Protopopescu, piano

with:

Visnja Kosanovic, flute

Jerry Schwarz and Bernie Arons, clarinet

Taka Ariga, 'cello

Matthew van Hoose and David Ehrlich, piano

Program:

FRIDAY

Quintet for piano and winds by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov ( 1844-1908)

Allegro con brio - Andante - Rondo. Allegro

Divertimento by Bernard Baert (1963-)

Allegro molto - Romance - Presto tempestoso

INTERMISSION

Adagio and Rondo, K. 617 by W.A. Mozart (1756-91)

Piano Quartet, op. 23 by Antonin Dvorak (1841-1904)

Allegro moderato - Andantino - Allegro scherzando

SUNDAY

Il maestro e lo scolare by F.J. Haydn (1732-1809)

Theme and Variations. Minuet

Konzertstuck #2 by Felix Mendelssohn (1809-47)

Allegro. Andante. Allegretto grazioso

Concertino for Flute by Cecile Chaminade (1858-1944)

Trio, op. 11 by Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)

Allegro con brio. Adagio. Theme and Variations

INTERMISSION

Vocalise by Sergei Rachmaninoff (1878-1948)

Aprhs une rhve by Gabriel Fauri (1858-1924)

Trio. Op. 63 by Carl Maria von Weber (1786-1826)

Allegro moderato. Scherzo. Vivace. Andante espressivo. Allegro giojoso

About the Artists

The ensemble CONTRASTS consists of four members of the faculty of the Royal Conservatories of Belgium. They have performed together throughout Europe for more than 20 years, participating in major festivals in Paris, Flanders, and Romania. The group's unusual instrumental combination affords an opportunity to explore and adapt a range of trios and quartets from the standard repertoire, which has led a number of contemporary composers to write for them.

Their initial American connection, which dates back almost 15 years, was with the University of North Carolina, at whose summer workshops in both Chapel Hill and Morges, Switzerland, they have comprised the core of the teaching faculty. More recently, they have made three concert tours of the United States, appearing from Boston to Spartanburg, South Carolina.

Kati Sebestyin studied in Budapest at the Franz Liszt Academy and later at the Royal Conservatory of Brussels before completing her studies at the prestigious Capel Musicale Reins Elizabeth. Today, she is head of the string section in Brussels, where she teaches privately as well as sitting regularly on juries and master classes. She is also a member of the Haydn String Quartet, concert mistress of the European Philharmonic, with whom she recently toured Spain and Germany as soloist, and founder and leader of the Sebastian Strings Chamber Orchestra in Antwerp, with all of whom she has recorded extensively.

Among Europe's leading violists, pedagogues, and chamber coaches, Erwin Schiffer is a native of Hungary, where one of his teachers at the Franz Liszt Academy was Zoltan Kodaly. In addition to joining Ms. Sebestyin in the Haydn Quartet and Contrasts, he is a member of the Trio Viotti. As such, he performs regularly throughout Europe - from Stockholm to Cadiz -and also in Turkey, Israel, Japan, and South Africa. He has led master classes in France, Germany, Spain, Switzerland, and the United States, and recorded on major labels, including DGG, Turnabout, and Vox.

Belgian-born Freddy Arteel's clarinet has been heard widely throughout Europe and North America, in both solo and chamber work. Mr. Arteel studied in Brussels, Paris, and Geneva; today, his teaching positions include Ghent, Aberystwyth (Wales), and the University of North Carolina. For 20 years he was the principal clarinet of the Philharmonic Orchestra of Antwerp. He has performed their own works for such luminaries as Khatchaturian, Copland, and Kabalevsky.

Dana Protopopescu's musical career began at a tender age in Bucharest, Romania, where she made her debut as soloist at 14. Moving to Brussels and Hannover, she worked under Eduardo del Pueyo and Karl Engel. She has traveled Russia extensively and performed as soloist with several major European orchestras. In Brussels, where she is professor of music at the Royal Conservatory, she has recorded frequently for radio and television and made several CDs including Mendelssohn's complete piano works and concerti of Weber, Schumann, and Hummel.


Notes on the Program

We're indebted to our good friend Phil Uhlmann who discovered that this familiar piece was the one of two pieces that Rimsky-Korsakov wrote for a competition and the one that won nothing. The second one, which won a prize, is never heard today. The original instrumentation is for flute, clarinet, horn, and bassoon with piano, which our friends have transcribed for their own use. The sprightly first movement is the only part ever heard. The contemplative second and peasant-dance third, with its brutally difficult piano part, are delightful additions to tonight's program.

The contemporary Flemish composer Bernard Baert has contributed a delightful divertimento (meant to divert!), an eighteenth-century Italian form. As we haven't heard it yet, we can only note that M. Baert finished his professional studies at the conser-vatory of Ghent with diplomas for piano and composition and studied composition with professor Roland Coryn. He obtained several prizes with compositions for chamber music (a piano trio and woodwind quintet). His output includes some forty more. In the beginning, composition was for Baert a "written-improvisation." During his studies his musical language crossed tonal and metric borders (but not too far!). After he finished te composition of his clarinet quartet (1996) he decided to simplify his way of composition. Crucial is the instant joy of making music. From 2000 on, with the composition of his "Piu meno" (More or Less) symphony he has added a spiritiual layer to his music.

As much as we know of Mozart's last works, little is known of the circumstances of the composition of this little-known gem. The two-movement structure, a form often used in Mozart's time, is simple and straightforward, and the melodies are the unmistakable combination of joy and sadness that permeate all his work.

Dvorak wrote two piano quartets of which this is by far the least often played. Contrasts' brilliance in recognizing the possibilities of adding the clarinet, an instrument Dvorak very rarely used, is an excellent way to bring it out of the obscurity in which it has languished ever since he wrote it.

The Haydn piano duet is our affectionate homage to our Chapel Hill teachers. Billed also as a sonata, it's a piece to be cheerfully botched in grand fashion. Notice that when the maestro is satisfied that his pupils are ready, he allows them to join him in the minuet.

Mendelssohn and the dumplings, or: The way to a composer's heart is through his stomach Mendelssohn was 20 when he paid his first visit to the father and son clarinetists Heinrich and Carl Bdrmann, "the most delightful day I ever spent... If all goes well, next time we shall] eat dumplings and play the A-flat major sonata." He may have grown fond of the Bdrmann's playing, but it seems he developed a weakness: for sweet dumplings and cheese strudel. So when the pair were next in Berlin, he asked them to prepare his favorite dishes, for which the quick-witted Bdrmanns requested as payment a duet for clarinet and basset horn with piano.

According to Carl, "When I showed up at the appointed time, Mendelssohn put a chef's hat on my head, drew an apron around my waist, and stuck a cooking spoon into the waistband. He did the same himself, except that instead of a spoon, he stuck a pen behind his ear and led me into the kitchen... He returned to his room where, as he said, he would "stir and knead the tones, add salt and pepper, sweeten, them and make a spicy sauce before cooking everything over a good hot fire...

"My heart skipped a beat, and I hoped the dumplings had risen properly. To my great relief, they had, and the cheese strudel was bubbling away melodiously in the pan. I then brought my offerings in covered dishes to the table. Mendelssohn had two duets in a covered dish. We rehearsed them after the dumplings, and Father and I were still more delighted with the charming piece than he was with the dumplings and strudel - though he kept saying my composition was more brilliant than his. One bears the title: 'The Battle near Prague, Grand Duet for Sweet Dumplings and Cheese Strudel or Clarinet and Basset Horn, composed and humbly dedicated to Bdrmann Senior and Junior by their very devoted Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy."

Cecile Chaminade was a French woman composer at a time when the idea of French women writing music was considered "barely acceptable," and her work was sniffed at by the French musical establishment of her day. Though it's true that many of her 400 pieces. mostly for piano solo, might be put down as purely salon (e.g., "lite"), more of it should be heard. And a lot more frequently. Embracing music as her lifelong obsession at the early age of eight, she wrote and taught in relative obscurity, served as the head of the French Office of Public Instruction, only occasionally emerging to give recitals of her own work, and travel to England to perform. What makes this charming little piece, which belongs in every self-respecting flutist's repertoire, is her thorough understanding of how to make the piano an intelligible accompanist to the showiness of the flute.

Beethoven penned this trio in Vienna in 1798. It begins with a bright allegro con brio, which is followed by one of the most majestic slow movements in the literature. A tale hangs on the last movement, a set of variations on a song from a long-forgotten comic opera, Amor Marinaro, by Joseph Weigl. Beethoven was then, if not yet a renowned composer in town, certainly the reigning pianist. A far lesser light named Daniel Steibelt sought to challenge him at a musical social by daring to embellish these variations with some of his own. Beethoven characteristically retaliated by playing the score of Steibelt's latest composition upside down, annihilating his would-be rival.

Both the Rachmaninoff and Fauri are transcriptions of music for the voice, one no more than "oh" and "ah"; the other a real song. Don't they sound marvelous on the mellow cello!

Weber is known primarily for his operas, and this charming trio is redolent of Der Freisch|tz. The sylvan first movement echoes the mysteries of the Wolf's Glen; the other three - the robust scherzo, shepherd's lament (presumably for an absent or lost love) inspired by a poem of Goethe, and gay, somewhat naive peasant procession of the finale evoke the joy of the dwellers of the Black Forest as they greet the return of spring.


The Eightieth Concert

Tuesday, September 16, 2003, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Visnja Kosanovic, flute

Laura Bachmann, soprano

Carolynj Zolbe, alto

Charles Bachmann, tenor

Jonathan Ward, bass

Carl Tretter, violin

Carol Warden, cello

David Ehrlich and Robert Rosen, piano

Program:

Neue Liebeslieder, op. 65 Johannes Brahms (1833-97)

1. Verzieht, o Herz
2. Finstere Schatten der Nacht
3. An jeder Hand
4 Ihs schwarzen Augen
5. Wahre, wahre, deinen Sohn
6. Rosen steckt mir an, Mutter
7. Von Gebirge Well'
8. Welche Graser in Reiver
9. Nagen und Herzen
10. Ich kose suss mit der
11. Alles, alles in den Wind
12. Schwarzen Wald, dein Schatten
13. Nein, Geliebter
14. Flammen Augen, dunkles Haar
15. Zum Schluss

Concertino for Flute, op. 108 by Cecile Chaminade (1857-1944)

INTERMISSION

Scottish Songs, op. 237 by Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)

1. Lochnagar
2. Schaferlied
3. Faithfu' Johnnie
4. Farewell Bliss
5a. A Soldier's Life
5b. Irish Blood
6. Charlie is my Darlin'
7. Enchantress, Farewell
8. Bonnie Laddie
9. The Chase of the Wolf
10. O might I but my Patrick Love
11. Sally in our Alley
12. Duncan Gray

Our Artists

Laura Bachmann delighted a Carnegie Hall audience with her solo rendition of Pierni's Children's Crusade (with the National Symphony), not to mention ours with an imitation of a cat. Otherwise, she sings regularly around town, especially with the Bach Consort and Washington Chorus.

Charles "Chip" Bachmann joins his wife Laura in singing in the Washington Chorus and Bach Consort in between soloing at area churches and cameo roles with the American Music Stage in Annandale. Both Chip and Laura did our 1991 Liebeslieder performance.

David Ehrlich learned the piano from his father, Richard, in Boston, starting at the age of six. Since discovering (at 7) that he wasn't destined to be the next Horowitz, he's resigned himself to being a musical amateur, studying with Matthew van Hoose, playing in such venues as Eugene, Ore.; Tiburon, Cal.; New York City, and Nagydorog, Hungary.

Visnja Kosanovic brings us her flute from Serbia, where she studied at the Salzburg Mozarteum and earned degrees at the Academy of Art in Novi Sad. Here, she's played with the National Gallery Orchestra and SWCP while honing her flute teaching and yoga skills.

Robert Rosen began piano studies at age 7, not too long before realizing that one must eat to live. Retired now from a career as attorney and CPA with Ernst & Young, Bob devotes his life to music. In addition to coordinating Laropa and conducting the Montrose Ensemble, he is director of public relations for the Friday Club and studies with Nancy Hallsted.

Carl Tretter enjoys his ca. 1760 Landolfi fiddle in local chamber groups and at the Bennington summer chamber workshop. Beginning violin studies at 6 at Interlochen, lawyer/businessman Carl now specializes in real estate investments.

Jonathan Ward proves the power of audacity over talent. President of the GRAMMY-winning Washington Chorus, soloist at St. Francis Episcopal Church in Potomac, and 5-string banjo with local bluegrass group Don't Tell Bob. Jonathan heads the Global Effectiveness Group, an international human resources consulting consortium.

Carol Warden began studying cello at age 10,. continued at the University of Michigan and beyond, and now plays in various chamber music groups. As CEO of Dale Music in Silver Spring, she continues expanding her love of music to benefit the local arts community.

Carolyn Zolbe, lifetime musician. Singing at two, then whistling, playing popular songs on the piano for teenager sing-alongs, school band and orchestra in the trombone section, community theater musicals, singing in (and in Savannah directing) Catholic church choirs, singing daily with her elementary school students, and privileged to sing for years for Paul Hill, as a chorister and soloist.


The Seventy-Ninth Concert

August 21, 2003, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Beth Lawrence, Joyce Bouvier and Rosemarie Houghton, sopranos

Luis Varda, tenor

Jonathan Ward, bass

Taka Ariga, cello

Visnja Kosanovic, flute

Jerry Schwarz, clarinet

David Ehrlich, piano

Program:

16th - 17th CENTURY

Jhon, Come Kisse me Now (Merry Wives) - Traditional

Constant Susanna (Merry Wives) - Greensleeves

Lawn as White as Driven Snow (A Winter's Tale) by Wilson

Your Awful Voice (The Tempest) by Purcell

These Happy Lovers (A Midsummer Night's Dream) by Purcell

Hark the Echoing Air (A Midsummer Night's Dream) by Purcell


18th - 19th CENTURY

Piangero (Julius Caesar) by Handel

Orpheus with his Lute (Henry VIII) by Arne

Under the Greenwood Tree (As You Like It) by Arne

Blow, blow, thou Winter Wind (As You Like It) by Arne

While you here doth Snoring Lie (The Tempest) by Arne

She never Told her Love (Twelfth Night) by Haydn

Hark, Hark, the Lark (Cymbeline) by Schubert

Who is Sylvia (Two Gentlemen of Verona) by Schubert

Overture (Coriolanus) by Beethoven


Brush up Your Shakespeare (Taming of the Shrew) by Porter


OPERA

Leve-toi, soleil (Romeo & Juliet) by Gounod

Credo in uno Dio (Othello) by Verdi

Overture (Romeo & Juliet) by Tchaikowsky

Montagues and Capulets (Romeo & Juliet) by Prokofiev

Gavotte (Hamlet) by Prokofiev


TWENTIETH CENTURY

It was a Lover and his Lass (Twelfth Night) by Foote

Under the Greenwood Tree (As You Like It) by Moore

When Icicles Hang (Love's Labours Lost) by Argento

Sigh no more, Ladies (Much Ado about Nothing) by Fisher

O Mistress Mine (As You Like It) by Finzi


BROADWAY

This Can't be Love (Comedy of Errors) by Rodgers & Hart

I am Ashamed (Taming of the Shrew) by Porter

Tonight (Romeo & Juliet) by Bernstein


About the Artists:

Taka Ariga worked closely with Stephen Kates at the Peabody Conservatory while pursuing engineering degrees. Also an avid pianist and conductor passionate about chamber music, Taka counts classical music as an integral part of his professional life as a consultant.

Trained in opera and art songs, Joyce Bouvier has crossed over into pop, entertaining residents of nursing homes. She is also director of music here at Saint Augustine's.

David Ehrlich learned the piano from his father, Richard, in Boston, starting at the age of six. Since discovering (at 7) he wasn't destined to be the next Horowitz, he's resigned himself to being a musical amateur, studying with Matthew van Hoose and playing in venues like Eugene, Ore.; Tiburon, Cal.; New York City; and Nagydorog, Hungary.

Rosemarie Ruiz Houghton hails from Pittsburgh, where she sang with its Opera. Since moving here, she's sung with the National Symphony. She also appears with Coral Cantigas, a Latin American chamber choir, and teaches voice at Catholic and NVCC.

Visnja Kosanovic brings us her flute from Serbia, where she earned degrees at the Academy of Art in Novi Sad before being invited to study with Peter-Lukas Graf at the Summer Mozarteum in Salzburg. Since coming here, she's appeared with the National Gallery Orchestra, and has developed her twin interests in flute teaching and yoga.

Attention to detail and joy in making music are two things Elizabeth Lawrence insists upon with students as director of Madrigals at Madeira School. A veteran performer, Beth holds a DMA from Peabody and masters from Illinois-Champaign. Among her special passions are Jane Austen novels, and her dog Princess Sniffy.

Impresario extraordinary Jerry Schwarz began his musical studies in Los Angeles at age ten and was UC-Berkeley Symphony's principal clarinet. But he isn't playing the clarinet tonight...you'll see why!


Notes on the Program:

What marvelous material the plays of Shakespeare make! There's a musical reference in nearly every one of the 38-work canon. Neither time nor space permits us to describe each of our choices from the practically 20,000 efforts made by the world's musical talents in the detail they deserve. But our effort tonight is to at least hint at their breadth and diversity.

While scholarship on the subject has been extensive, nobody really knows what music may have appeared in the original productions; the point is that since he didn't specify much, each age has felt completely free to shape its own interpretations - both instrumental and vocal. Grand opera, ballet, and Broadway plays and musicals have been inspired by these stories - movie music, too. The tragic star-crossed lovers Romeo and Juliet, the villainous Richard III and Iago, the merriment of the wives of Windsor, the majesty of Henry V and Julius Caesar, the fairies of a midsummer night, the shrewish Kate, and the mystic Prospero are only a few of the memorable figures who come to life through music.


The Seventy-Eighth Concert

June 12, 2003, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Jerry Schwarz, clarinet

and friends Carol Hall, violin

Tom Blackburn, cello

Rosemarie Houghton, soprano

Elizabeth Dyson and Graham Down, piano

Program:

"Clarinet" Trio in B-flat, op. 11 by Ludwig van Beethoven

Sonata for Clarinet and Piano, op. 129 by Charles Villiers Stanford

Three pieces for soprano, clarinet, piano by G. Hermann

Songs of Innocence by Arnold Cooke (on texts of William Blake)

Suite for Violin, Clarinet, Piano, op. 157b by Darius Milhaud


Our Artists:

Clarinetist and annual impresario Jerry Schwarz began his musical studies in Los Angeles at age ten and was UC-Berkeley Symphony's principal clarinet. He served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Senegal and taught English at American University, broken by a year's Fulbright in Florence and Barcelona. An avid chamber music (and father of two more!), Jerry has appeared on nearly half of our SWCP programs since 1997 as well as founding the woodwind Trio Con Brio and Focus Trio.

Tom Blackburn studied with Carl Werner, Joseph, Tonaur, and Pasquale di Conto, but his principal teachers have been cellos made by unknown masters who posted other people's names in them. A member of the Geological Society of Washington and Hunt String Quartet, he's been a frequent and welcome member of SWCP.

Rosemarie Ruiz Houghton hails from Pittsburgh, where she sang with its Opera. Since moving here, she's sung with the National Symphony and appears with Coral Cantigas, a Latin American chamber choir, and teaches voice at Catholic and NVCC.

Carol Hall graduated from Kansas State and the University of New Hampshire. A former faculty member of Phillips Exeter, UNH, and VanderCook in Chicago, she conducted youth orchestras in Winnetka, Illinois. During a 12-year hitch in Brussels, she was a founding member of the International Chamber Players.

Elizabeth Dyson embarked on a second career as a chamber musician after 30 years of practicing law. Currently a pianist at the Washington School of Ballet, she has accompanied the Odyssey Opera Theater and also taught ballet accompaniment at the Levine School.

Graham Down, a graduate of Kings College, Cambridge, and Christchurch, Oxford, is an associate of the Royal College of Music in organ performance. A past master of math and fund-raising, he's currently master of music at Epiphany Church in Georgetown.


Notes on the Program:

Beethoven penned this trio in Vienna in 1798. It begins with a bright allegro con brio, which is followed one of the most majestic slow movements in the literature. A tale hangs on the last movement, a set of variations on a song from a long-forgotten comic opera, Amor Marinaro, by Joseph Weigl. Beethoven was then, if not yet a renowned composer in town, certainly the reigning pianist. A far lesser light named Daniel Steibelt sought to challenge him at a musical social by daring to embellish these variations (just published) with some of his own. Beethoven characteristically retaliated by playing the score of Steibelt's latest composition upside down, annihilating his would-be rival.

Sometimes dubbed the English Brahms for his late romantic (perhaps Victorian is a better word), Stanford was actually an Irishman,. though one who spent most of his life in London. Entering Cambridge in 1870, he soon became conductor of the university orchestra. His first love, compositions based on Irish folksongs, won a number of prizes. Indeed tonight's splendid sonata is filled with such mournful tunes. Worthy of special attention is the deeply unsettling second-movement dirge "Caoine" (pronounced "keen"), the uniquely Irish version of the wail of despair of widows everywhere.

Not much is known of Mr. Hermann, but Englishman Cooke, who also wrote a marvelous clarinet sonata we did three years ago, studied composition in Berlin during the 1920s. The texts are by mystic English poet William Blake (1757-1827).

The Milhaud trio exemplifies the playful aspect of much of the music turned out by an early 20th-century group called "Les Cinq," who tired of the impressionism of Debussy and wanted a lot more satiric bite in their work. Witty, irreverent, and fun, this delightful five-part work explores combining instruments considered uncombinable. Be sure to listen for snatches of the contemporary "Lullaby of Broadway!"


The Seventy-Seventh Concert

Thursday, May 22, 2003 at 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Mark Furth, violin

Take Aria, cello

David Ehrlich, piano

Beth Lawrence and Joyce Bouvier, soprano

Program:

Violin Sonata in G Major, BWV 1021 by J. S. Bach

Songs WITH Words by Felix Mendelssohn

Sonata for Cello and Piano in D major, op. 58 by Mendelssohn

Trio in C Minor, op. 66 by Mendelssohn


Our Artists:

Self-acknowledged chamber music junkie Mark Furth plays with friends in Chapel Hill, N.C., when not in D.C. (he's a biotech research scientist here). A bi-coastal (San Diego, too) chamber workshop enthusiast, Mark studies violin and viola with members of the Ciompi Quartet at Duke University.

Taka Ariga worked closely with Stephen Kates at the Peabody Conservatory while pursuing engineering degrees. Also an avid pianist and conductor passionate about chamber music, Taka counts classical music as an integral part of his professional life as a consultant, collaborating often with Herbert Greenberg, George Lucktenberg, and Jane Bastion.

David Ehrlich learned the piano from his father Richard in Boston, beginning at the age of six. Since discovering (at 7) he wasn't destined to be the next Horowitz, he's resigned himself to life as a musical amateur, studying with Matthew van Hoose and playing for friends in venues like Eugene, Oregon; Tiburon, California; New York City; and Nagydorog, Hungary.

Attention to detail and joy in making music are two things Elizabeth Lawrence shares with students in her capacity as director of Madrigals at Madeira School. A veteran performer, Beth holds a DMA from Peabody and masters from Illinois-Champaign. Among her special passions are Jane Austen novels and her dog Princes Sniffy.

Trained in opera and art songs, Joyce Bouvier has since crossed over to popular music and now performs regularly for residents of retirement and nursing homes. On Sundays, she's now Director of Music at St. Augustine's.


Notes on the Program:

As Mendelssohn himself might have done, we begin our program by paying homage to his master and mentor, J.S. Bach who, dead less than 100 years when Felix was born, had been largely forgotten by the music world. But not by aspiring musicians like Felix. Forced to pore over the old master's what others found dry harmonies and musty counterpoint, he realized what treasures the world had thrown on the bonfire of history and brought the old man back to life. Not only did he single-handedly resurrect the great St. Matthew Passion, but went on to fill his own very 19th-century work with many of the beloved old chorale tunes, as we see tonight.

Mendelssohn's extraordinary virtuosic piano style was geared to the instrument for which he wrote with its shallow keys and very fast action that made his brilliant passagework sound like the lovely tracery it does. His melodies' candy-like sweetness is perhaps best exemplified tonight in the trio's second movement. And Mendelssohn, though born a Jew, converted to an Anglican, inspired in part by visits to England and Queen Victoria, and revered the Christian church's hymns, using them magnificently in both the sonata and the trio. Last, it's worth mentioning his love of the sea and its mysteries ... the rushing waves that bring our evening to its glorious conclusion.

Tonight's major works are similar in feeling if not in mood. The sonata, in the joyous key of D Major, begins with a rollicking 6/8 melody passed back and forth between cello and piano. It's followed by a charming light scherzo which forms the bridge to the adagio chorale setting and brilliant perpetuum mobile finale.

The C-minor trio, called the dark one, was composed five years later, and is nearly symphonic in scale. The first movement, though perhaps over-long, pulses with nervous energy; the wistful slow second is filled with cloying melodies and radiant harmonies. The fantastic scherzo is best performed a at a tempo most reasonable persons might consider suicidal. And then we come to the finale, where one might be on the prow of a ship propelled by strong (but sunny) gales that's suddenly brought up short by the appearance of the familiar chorale from the Genevan Psalter of 1562 before ending with the very English Christmas carol, "I Saw Three Ships Come Sailing In."


The Seventy-Sixth Concert

Tuesday, April 22, 2003 at 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

The Living Water

an a cappella sacred music service choir
Ron Duquette, Director

Program:

Lenten and post-Lenten music


The Seventy-Fifth Concert

Tuesday, March 25, 2003 at 7:30 p.m.

Part of the annual National Cherry Blossom Festival

Featuring:

Mark Furth, violin

Carl Tretter, violin

Peggy Orchowski, violin

Peter Skopek, violin

Jaap van Wesel, viola

Taka Ariga, cello

Jerry Schwarz, clarinet

David Ehrlich, piano

Beth Lawrence, soprano

Joyce Bouvier, soprano

Program:

"Malickosti" (Bagatelles) by Antonin Dvorak (1841-1904)

1. Allegretto scherzando - 2. Minuetto: Grazioso - 3. Allegretto - 4. Canon - 5. Allegro

"Passacaglia" from Suite VII by G. F. Handel (1685-1759), arr. J. Halvorson for violin and cello

Overture on Hebrew Themes, op. 34 by Sergei Prokofiev (1890-1953)

Sous le dome epais (from Lakme) by Leo Delibes (1836-91)

Quintet for piano and strings in E-flat, op. 44 by Robert Schumann (1810-56)


Mere bagatelles - music of little lasting value, yet charming, Dvorak's five little pieces are reminiscent of his better known Slavonic Dances, evoking a beer-drenched Bohemian garden on a sunny Sunday afternoon. Though the keyboard parts are generally played on an accordion or harmonium, we think the piano is not a bad substitute.

Handel's music lends itself easily to transcription. The brilliant passacaglia (literally, passage) from his Seventh Suite is a perfect case in point. The repetitive fugal lines, effective on the keyboard, challenged the nineteenth-century Halvorsen to turn and challenge a skilled string duo.

Prokofiev's delightful work for six players was suggested to him while he was on a visit to Tin Pan Alley New York in 1919. The tunes are based on traditional Yiddish melodies; the itinerant Jewish peddler, brilliantly portrayed on the clarinet, is a source of great fun.

Set in India, Delibes' Lakme has a faintly absurd plot and two fabulous arias, of which the duet is probably the better known. Two Hindu ladies, Lakme and her servant Mallika, survey an exotic garden, exclaiming over its beauties as they try to avoid discussing the more foreboding aspects of the story.

Schumann's wondrous piano quintet stands at the supreme pinnacle of romantic nineteenth-century music. Though a tragic figure himself, Schumann infuses every bit of this expressive piece with joyful, springlike melodies, thoroughly exploring (and challenging to the fullest) the potential of each of his players. Each of the four movements has its own distinctive melody that recurs throughout, interspersed with abrupt shifts of mood. The exuberant opening movement, filled with the sunny optimism of a gorgeous cello solo, is interrupted by an extraordinary outburst from the piano before climbing the heights again. The second is a stately funeral march dominated by the first violin. This gives way to an angry agitato carried by the viola and piano, but that too gives way to a vision of a moonlit night (perhaps a final acceptance of loss). The bravura scherzo is a blur of scales, punctuated by a pair of contrasting trios, holds its own despite constantly threatening to run away with itself. The final alla breve has enough melodic material for four more movements - another succession of glorious episodes of varying speeds and moods - ultimately bringing the entire work to a brilliant triumphant conclusion.


Self-confessed chamber music junkie Mark Furth plays with friends in Chapel Hill, N.C., where he lives when not in D.C., (he's a biotech research scientist here). A bicoastal (San Diego, too) chamber workshop enthusiast, Mark studies with the Ciompi Quartet at Duke University.

Carl Tretter enjoys his ca. 1760 Landolfi fiddle in local chamber groups and at the Bennington (Vt.) chamber music workshop. Beginning violin studies at 8 at Interlochen, lawyer/businessman Carl now specializes in investments.

Peggy Orchowski is a California girl who's been playing violin since she and an identical twin sister made up 2/3 of a trio at age 7. Rediscovering chamber music 20 years later, she's taken it to Prague, Corfu, and now here.

Jaap van Wesel, our versatile violin/violist, comes to Washington from the Netherlands. He works here for Dutch Radio and collects old violins.

Taka Ariga worked closely with Stephen Kates at Peabody Conservatory while pursuing engineering degrees at Hopkins. Also a passionate pianist and conductor, Taka counts chamber music as an integral part of his professional life as a consultant.

SWCP stalwart Jerry Schwarz began his musical studies at age 10 in Los Angeles. An avid chamber musician, he's also appeared with the D.C. Community Orchestra and Rock Creek Woodwind Quintet.

David Ehrlich learned the piano at 6 from his father, Richard, in Boston. Since learning, at age 7, that he wasn't destined to be the next Horowitz, he's been a musical amateur, studying with Matthew van Hoose, performing for friends and charities, and managing the Southwest Chamber Players.

The joy of making music is what Elizabeth Lawrence shares with students in her capacity as director of Musical Arts at Madeira School. She holds a DMA from Peabody and a masters from Illinois-Champaign.

Trained in opera and art songs, Joyce Bouvier has largely crossed over to popular music and performs regularly for residents of retirement and nursing homes as well as serving as Director of Music at Saint Augustine's.


The Seventy-Fourth Concert

Thursday, February 27, 2003 at 7:30 p.m.
(this concert was canceled due to inclement weather)

Featuring:

John Kaboff, cello

Alfred Clark, piano

Program:

Suite Italienne (after Pergolesi) by Igor Stravinsky (1882-1973)

Introduzione - Serenata - Aria - Minuetto e finale

Sonata in D minor for Cello and Piano, op. 40 by Dmitri Shostakovich (1906-75)

Allegro ma non tanto - Allegro - Largo - Allegro

Vocalise, op. 34 by Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873-1943)

Sonata in G minor for Cello and Piano, op. 19 by Rachmaninoff


Notes on the Program:

Stravinsky was one of many whose early twentieth-century works paid homage to the Italian eighteenth century. This charming Suite Italienne is based on themes from Pulcinella, a ballet by the short-lived (1710-36) Neapolitan Giovanni Batista Pergolesi. Though its musical forms are decidedly baroque, the harmonies are frequently not.

Noted primarily for his fabulously romantic piano works, the Russian-born Rachmaninoff escaped his native country during the 1917 and spent the rest of his life in this country. His concertos and piano preludes are staples of every pianist's repertoire. The vocalise needs little introduction; the cello sonata, an early work, is considered to be among the most challenging in the literature for both performers.


About the Artists:

John Kaboff, graduate of the University of Indiana, was a student of Janos Starker, and later with William Pleeth, teacher of Jacqueline DuPre. He has performed in Vienna (with the Chicago Symphony), Amsterdam (with the Concertgebouw), and Sydney, as well as Germany and Switzerland. A Washingtonian today, he performs locally and teaches a class of budding cellists that has received accolades from no less than Yo Yo Ma.

Alfred Clark used his Catholic University degree in Germany and Italy, working with Birgit Nilsson and Rudolf Firkusny. Here in town, he accompanies the NSO's Youth Fellowship program and teaches master classes.


The Seventy-Third Concert

Thursday, February 6, 2003 at 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Charles Beek, violin

Gennifer Sussman, viola

Taka Ariga, cello

David Ehrlich, piano

Elizabeth Lawrence, soprano

Program:

Ridente la calma, K. 523 by W.A. Mozart (1756-91)

Das Veilchen, K. 476 by Mozart

Als Luise die Briefe ihres ungetreues Liebhabers verbrannte, K. 281 by Mozart

Quartet in G minor, K. 478 by Mozart

Allegro - Andante - Rondo: Allegro


INTERMISSION

Am Sonntag Morgen, op. 49, #1 by Johannes Brahms (1833-97)

Ach, wende diesen Blick, op. 57, #4 by Brahms

O wüsst' ich doch den Weg, op. 63, #8 by Brahms

Quartet in G minor, op. 25 by Brahms

Allegro - Intermezzo - Andante con moto - Rondo alla zingarese

About Our Artists:

Newcomer Charles Beek has been making music around town for a number of years.

Gennifer Sussman is another welcome addition to our growing ranks. A fixture in the Friday Morning Music Club, she serves on the board of the Washington Bach Consort.

Attention to detail and joy in making music are two things Elizabeth Lawrence shares with students in her capacity as director of the Dramatic Arts program at Madeira School. A veteran performer, Beth holds a DMA from Peabody and masters from Illinois-Champaign. Among her special passions are Mozart symphonies and her dog Princess Sniffy.

Old friend Taka Ariga returns to join us. While pursuing engineering degrees, Taka, who's also an avid pianist and conductor passionate about chamber music, worked with Stephen Kates at the Peabody Conservatory. He considers classical music an integral part of his professional life as a consultant, and plays as much as he can with Herbert Greenberg and Jane Bastien.

David Ehrlich learned the piano from his father, Richard, in Boston, beginning at the age of six. Since discovering (at seven) that he wasn't destined to be the next Horowitz, he's resigned himself to life as a musical amateur, studying with Matthew van Hoose and playing for friends in venues like Eugene, Oregon; Tiburon, California; New York City; and Nagydorog, Hungary.


Notes on the Program:

It's no accident that tonight's program is in the moody key of G minor. Why? Because both the great muses of our six-year-old chamber series, Mozart and Brahms, adored its warm, soulful expressiveness and the effortlessness with which it flows in and out of its related B-flat major key.

The 1780s were Mozart most prolific decade, accounting for many of his 41 symphonies and 27 piano concertos. But he somehow found time to turn out a myriad of smaller works - sonatas for a variety of instruments, string quartets and quintets, and a dozen works for ensembles with piano, of which this charming quartet is among the best. Conceived like a piano concerto, it's definitely virtuoso piano stuff, and follows the concerto form: fast/slow/fast.

We decided to add the two short groups of songs as appetizers. Both Mozart and Brahms were showmen - Mozart perhaps more extrovertedly.

Brahms's op. 25 quartet is the work of a 27-year-old whose life has already been colored by the joys and sorrows that most of us take a lifetime to experience. In spite of its warm, rich melodic content, its tone is clearly somber. The stately first movement opens with the measured (funereal?) tread of marching feet that evolves into a conversation between strings and piano and a remarkable series of variations. The wistful intermezzo is a graceful dance with an animated trio. The noble andante con moto is another march, this time with the feel of a wind band passing before us. The famous rondo, with its bumptious dance rhythms interpolated with soulful gypsy melodies, is often done separately - by gypsies!, who have gladly re-adopted it as their own.


The Seventy-Second Concert

Thursday, January 9, 2003 at 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

LAROPA

Paul Balabanis, horn

Robin Barr, oboe

Paul Chassy, bassoon

Laura Langbein, clarinet

Jackie Miller, flute

Robert Rosen, piano

Program:

Quintet in E-flat major, K. 452 by W.A. Mozart (1756-91)

Largo; Allegro moderato - Larghetto - Rondo: Allegretto

Quintet in A minor, op. 80 by Ferdinand Thieriot (1838-1919)

Allegro non troppo - Intermezzo: Allegretto - Adagio - Allegro vivace

INTERMISSION

Sextet in B-flat major, op. 6 by Ludwig Thuille (1861-1907)

Allegro moderato - Larghetto - Andante, quasi allegretto - Finale: Vivace

About the Artists:

Formed in 1996, the ensemble Laropa performs in libraries and independent and assisted living facilities. Its members originally met playing together at a sight-reading session of the Montgomery County Chamber Music Society and decided to form a serious amateur group. The name was derived from the first two initials of the founding members' first names. All except Ms. Miller also join in the Montrose Ensemble.

Having abandoned the horn after college, Paul Balabanis returned to his instrument in middle age while a U.S. Foreign Service officer. Now retired, he studies with former NSO principal Edwin Thayer and plays in the Columbia, Howard County Ballet, and Washington Conservatory orchestras.

Robin Barr grew up in the Chicago area. While in Boston, where she played with the Metropolitan Wind and Cambridge symphonies as well as the Harvard Wind Ensemble; and then here in 1995, where she plays both oboe and English horn with the Trinity Chamber Orchestra and Players. By day, she is Linguist-in-Residence at American University.

Paul Chassy studied with the N.Y. Philharmonic's principal bassoon as a youth, resuming after a 30-year hiatus. A student of Linda Harwell at Peabody, he's performed with the McLean and Trinity Chamber orchestras; he's now in the Montgomery College Community and Prince George Philharmonic.

Laura Langbein studied with Harold Wright (NSO) and Paul Eberly. A performing member of the Friday Morning Music Club, she also appears with the Rockville Concert Band and Victorian Lyric Pit Opera. During the day, she's professor of public policy at American University.

Jackie Miller graduated from Frostburg (Md) State, majoring in music education. She's principal flute of the Montgomery County Symphony, a founding member of Silverwinds, a professional quartet, and The Musical Offering. She teaches music in the Montgomery County public schools.

Robert Rosen began piano studies at age 7, not too long before he was told he had to eat to live. Retired now from a career as attorney and CPA with Ernst & Young, Bob devotes his life to music. In addition to coordinating Laropa and conducting the Montrose Ensemble, he is director of public relations for the Friday Club and studies with Nancy Hallsted.


Notes on the Program:

Mozart described his delicious piano/wind quintet, composed and premiered in 1784, to his father as "the best work I have ever composed." It was a novel conception for its time, not least for the last movement cadenza for the entire ensemble. This wonderful work set a pattern for later composers who produced piano/wind combinations, notably Beethoven, whose op. 16 followed closely Mozart's structure, key, and tempi.

Thieriot, who despite his French name, was of German origin, emerged from the circle around Brahms. Cellist and artistic director of the Musikverein in Steiermark in Graz, Austria, he later lived in Hamburg. Stylistically in the spirit of Mendelssohn, Spohr, and Brahms (with not a little assist from Wagner and Bruckner), his 100-work output is mostly for combinations of strings. The present piece was composed in 1907, but is definitely in the romantic tradition of his various mentors, plus Schumann and Grieg. Each of its four movements has a strong, memorable melody; the third most resembles Brahms.

Like Thieriot, the work of Thuille is that of a relative unknown. Another Frenchman, this one born in Italy, he was at the age of 22 appointed a professor of music at the Munich Conservatory. this sextet, his best known work, dates from 1885-87, and is natural and fresh, melodic and romantic. Its extremely difficult piano part mainly supports the virtuosic solo work given to the winds. It was submitted, at the urging of Richard Strauss, to a Beethoven competition and walked off with first prize. What do you think?


The Seventy-First Concert

Thursday, December 19, 2002, at 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Catherine Justice, soprano

Tom Blackburn, cello

Wendy Caudle, oboe

David Ehrlich, piano

Rosemarie Houghton, soprano

Visnja Kosanovic, flute

Robert Londis, bass

Jose Luis Sanchez, tenor

Jerry Schwarz, clarinet

.

The Potomac Mandolin Ensemble:

Lynn Falk, mandolin, octave mandola

Annette Henzke, mandolin, guitar

Pat Kibler, mandola

Hoang Le, guitar

Edith Pötzschke, mandolin

Program:

Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme by J.S. Bach (arr. Z. Kocsis)

Ich folge dich gleichfalls (from St. John Passion) by J.S. Bach

Uns ist ein Kind geboren (bass) by J.S. Bach

Gesu bambino by Pietro Yon

Adeste Fideles (Traditional carol)

Ich bin vergnügt (from Cantata 105) by J.S. Bach (1685-1750)

Benedictus (from Mass in G) by Franz Schubert (1797-1828)

Le sommeil de l'infant Jésus by Henri Busser (1872-1973)

Carol by Vaulx

Largo (from Cello Sonata) by Frédéric Chopin (1810-49)

Hark the Herald Angels Sing by Felix Mendelssohn (1803-47)

INTERMISSION

Potomac Mandolin Ensemble:

Walnut Valley Suite 1999 by Bruce Graybill

Andante - Allegro

Fandangillo (from Suite Castellana) by Moreno-Torroba

Amelia (2002 National Heritage winner) by Bob McQuillen

Carol of the Bells by Leontovich

.

Berceuse (from Jocelyn) by Benjamin Godard (1849-95)

Magnificat (from Christmas Oratorio) by Camille Saint-Saens (1835-1921)

O little Town of Bethlehem by Brooks/Sears

Madrigal by Philippe Gaubert (1879-1941)

Still, Still, Still by Anonymous (arr. Philip Ledger)

O Holy Night by Adolphe Adam


The Seventieth Concert

Tuesday, November 19 at 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Peggy Orchowski, violin

Take Ariga, violoncello

Visnja Kosanovic, flute

Jerry Schwarz, clarinet

Joyce Bouvier, soprano

David Ehrlich, piano

Program:

Andante for Flute in C, K. 315 by W.A. Mozart (1756-91)

English Songs and Canzonettas by F.J. Haydn (1732-1809)

1. A Pastoral Song (Schäferlied)
2. Recollection (Rückinnerung)
3. The Mermaid's Song (Die Seejungfer)
4. The Spirit's Song (Des Geistes Gesang)
5. Fidelity (Treue)

Tarantella, op. 6, with flute and clarinet by Camille Saint-Saens (1835-1921)

INTERMISSION

Trio, op. 97, in B-flat ("Archduke") by Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)

Allegro moderato - Scherzo. Allegro - Andante cantabile - Allegro moderato

About Our Artists:

Trained in opera and art songs, Joyce Bouvier has since crossed over to popular music and now performs regularly for residents of retirement and nursing homes. And, having quit her "day job," she's become Director of Music here at Saint Augustine's.

Taka Ariga worked closely with Stephen Kates at the Peabody Conservatory while pursuing engineering degrees. Also an avid pianist and conductor passionate about chamber music, Taka counts classical music as an integral part of his professional life as a consultant, collaborating frequently with Herbert Greenberg, George Lucktenberg, and Jane Bastien.

Visnya Kosanovic brings us her flute from Serbia, where she earned degrees at the Academy of Art in Novi Sad before being invited to study with Peter-Lukas Graf at the Summer Mozarteum in Salzburg. Since coming here, she's appeared frequently with the National Gallery Orchestra.

Southwest Chamber stalwart Jerry Schwarz began his musical studies at age 10 in Los Angeles. A teacher at American University and avid chamber musician, he's also appeared with the D.C. Community Orchestra and Rock Creek Woodwind Quintet.

David Ehrlich learned the piano from his father, Richard, in Boston, starting at the age of six. Since discovering (at 7) he wasn't destined to be the next Horowitz, he's resigned himself to life as a musical amateur, studying with Matthew van Hoose and playing for friends in venues like Eugene, Ore.; Tiburon, Cal.; New York City; and Nagydorog, Hungary.


Notes on the Program:

Mozart's distaste for the flutes of his time ("they always go flat," he used to complain) Is certainly not apparent in this brief gem of a fragment for flute and orchestra. As with much of his music, there is more than a trace of sadness even though it's written in the major mode.

The Haydn songs come from his first visit to London, in 1792. There, released from his private Esterhazy employment, he was lionized by polite society. The wife of a prominent surgeon, Anne Hunter, took him under her wing, helping him to learn English. In the process she wrote song texts that fared well in England, but fell flat when translated into German, being soon overshadowed by the masterpieces of Schubert, Schumann, and Brahms. So we present them in his adopted language.

The word "tarantella" is doubtless connected to the tarantula spider. It means a wild dance, probably of gypsy origin, portraying bodies writhing awkwardly in the grip of the spider's bite. This very early work, possibly a student one, is a brilliant tour de force for all three players.

And then we come to the Archduke Trio, arguably the noblest composition in the chamber genre, if not in all music. Archduke Rudolf of Austria was Beethoven's pupil as well as his friend and patron, and the Master lavished much care on this miraculous piece. Long (45 minutes) for such a work, its four movements add to a sort of compendium of music to date. The majestic opening allegro moderato, with its simple yet sweeping opening theme, grows in intensity, as if to burst the bounds of the imagination. Yes, there's a touch of pomposity, but ... such pomposity! The scherzo, reminiscent perhaps of the tarantula dance, goes at the speed of light, with enormous wit in its intricate chromatics. Some might call the serene third movement, an air and variations, the apex of the piece, but then along comes the glorious finale, which ascends higher still as it crowns the work in the utmost grandeur.

Not inappropriately, the Archduke has been called the "Mount Everest" of the chamber canon. Once one has mastered this work (to which one can easily devote a lifetime trying), it's hard to imagine anything any finer.


The Sixty-Ninth Concert

Tuesday, October 22 at 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Visnya Kosanovic, flute

Jason Koczur, horn

Elizabeth Lawrence and Barbara Carnes, soprano

Jose Luis Sanchez, tenor

David Ehrlich, piano

Program:

Sonata in D minor for horn and piano by Arcangelo Corelli (1653-1713)

Preludio - Corrente - Sarabanda - Giga

Sonata in C major for flute and cembalo by J.S. Bach (1685-1750)

Prelude: Andante. Presto - Allegro - Adagio - Menuetto I and II

Abendempfindung, K. 523 by W.A. Mozart (1756-91)

Four Songs for two women's voices, Op. 61 by Johannes Brahms (1833-97)

1. Die Schwestern
2. Klosterfraülein
3. Phänomen
4. Die Boten der Liebe

Lève-toi, soleil! (Roméo et Juliette) by Charles Gounod (1818-93)

INTERMISSION

Benedetto (Sonnet #47 of Francesco Petrarch - two versions) by Franz Liszt (1811-86)

Oh! quand je dors

Sonata for flute and piano by Francis Poulenc (1899-1963)

Allegretto malincolico - Cantilena - Presto giocoso

Auf dem Strom, op. 119 by Franz Schubert (1797-1828)


About Our Artists:

Visnya Kosanovic brings the sounds of her flute from Serbia, where she earned degrees at the Academy of Art in Novi Sadbefore being invited to study with Peter-Lukas Graf at the Summer Mozarteum in Salzburg, Austria. Since coming to the U.S., she's appeared frequently with the National Gallery Orchestra.

Jason Koczur is a Northern Virginian newly returned from seven years studying horn, five in Boston with Eric Ruske and Richard Menaul and two in London with Michael Thompson and Richard Watkins. Currently he's free-lancing and studying with Edwin Thayer of the NSO.

Attention to detail and joy in making music are two things Elizabeth Lawrence shares with students in her capacity as director of the Dramatic Arts program at Madeira School. A veteran performer, Beth holds a DMA from Peabody and masters from Illinois-Champaign. Among her special passions are Mozart symphonies and her dog Princess Sniffy.

Barbara Carnes sang for some years with the Oratorio Society of Washington.

A native of San Juan, Puerto Rico, Jose Luis Sanchez is a singer of melodies drawn from the art song, opera, oratorio, and zarzuela repertoire. He's appeared in San Juan, New York, Freiburg, and here, where Robert Londis coaches his transition from baritone to tenor. Jose says, "When I work, God respects me, but when I sing He loves me."

David Ehrlich learned the piano from his father, Richard, in Boston, beginning at the age of six. Since discovering (at 7) he wasn't destined to be the next Horowitz, he's resigned himself to life as a musical amateur, studying with Matthew van Hoose and playing for friends in venues like Eugene, Ore.; Tiburon, Cal.; New York City; and Nagydorog, Hungary.


Notes on the Program:

Corelli's music appears on our program for the first time tonight. Known to novel and movie buffs primarily for his mandolin, he was a major performer and composer for the violin at Rome, enjoying the favor of the highest church circles. His oeuvre has been transcribed for many other instruments; we love the way this brief sonata works on the horn.

What can be said about Bach that hasn't been said better by others? That he enjoyed writing for the flute is obvious, but that the flute for which he wrote was often not silver and was far harder to play, and that the cembalo accompanying the flute was smaller, could not rise in volume, and had no pedals.

Rarely was Mozart more eloquent than in this somber musing on his own mortality, though its composition predated his death by four years.

It may seem a long leap from Mozart to Brahms. Why do we perform so much Brahms? Simply because we find it a seemingly inexhaustible mine of riches. This set of four duets was written for the women's chorale that he led in his native Hamburg. Charming, harmonically ravishing, and full of his favorite rhythmic tricks, their material appears many times in different forms throughout his orchestral as well as his vocal and chamber works.

Liszt brought a measure of intensity to his work. Writing at the flood tide of 19th-century romanticism, he reveled in the passionate sonnets the 14th-century Italian poet Petrarch wrote on his unrequited love for Laura, setting three of them both as piano solos and songs for tenor.

If you think that was a great leap, this one a lot bigger. This sonata, written for Jean Pierre Rampal and dedicated to Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge, is a different kind of ecstasy of two voices, but these aren't human. Although Poulenc wrote primarily for singers, he was fascinated by bird songs, incorporating them frequently into his music for winds, as in this sumptuously gorgeous work.

Tonight's program ends with a SWCP favorite, one that remains fresh and vibrant. Odd as it seems, Schubert's melancholy Auf dem Strom was once rearranged for performance by a tenor who could and did also play the horn. Fortunately for us all, that version was never recorded for posterity and doesn't seem to have survived otherwise.


The Sixty-Eighth Concert

Wednesday, September 11, 2002, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Miriam Albin Bradley, viola

Take Ariga, cello

Gerard Catus, reader

David Ehrlich, piano

The Program:

"Arpeggione" Sonata by Franz Schubert (1797-1828)

Allegro moderato - Adagio - Allegretto

Ashokan Farewell by Jay Ungar (contemporary)

INTERMISSION

"Viola" Trio, op. 114 by Johannes Brahms (1833-97)

Allegro - Adagio - Andante grazioso - Allegro

Our Artists:

Miriam Albin Bradley began her formal musical studies in Cairo, Egypt, on the piano, continuing later on viola with the NSO's Murray Labman. At the University of Richmond, she earned degrees in math and music, studying with Honggang Li of the Shanghai Quartet. A performer in many venues, in her spare time, Miriam also researches folk songs.

Taka Ariga worked closely with Stephen Kates at the Peabody Conservatory while pursuing engineering degrees. Also an avid pianist and conductor passionate about chamber music, Taka counts classical music as an integral part of his professional life as a consultant, collaborating frequently Herbert Greenberg, George Lucktenberg, and Jane Bastien.

Hardly a stranger to Southwesters, Gerard Catus is a brilliant newcomer to SWCP. He is the president of the SW Neighborhood Assembly.

David Ehrlich learned the piano from his father, Richard, in Boston, starting at the age of six. Since discovering (at 7) he wasn't destined to be the next Horowitz, he's resigned himself to life as a musical amateur, studying with Matthew van Hoose and playing for friends in venues like Eugene, Ore.; Tiburon, Cal.; New York City; and Nagydorog, Hungary.

Notes on the Program:

Schubert's magical sonata for the six-stringed half-guitar, half-cello arpeggione is actually 100% of the literature for this odd contraption which was invented in 1823 in Vienna, and forgotten there in 1824. That said, however, this delicious bit of Viennese fluff which, ideally, is best listened to with a stein of frothy German beer in hand, makes a perfect showpiece for any number of instruments, including flute and clarinet, though most generally the cello, as we heard here in April or, as tonight, the viola.

The saga of Ashokan Farewell begins in the Catskill Mountains of Ashokan, N.Y., where fiddler Jay Ungar runs a summer fiddle and dance camp for adults (ashokan is an Indian word meaning a place to fish - in fact, it's a reservoir!) Feeling morose and abandoned when the camp closed after the 1982 season, Ungar sat down and composed a nineteenth-century Appalachian-style lament for his departed friends. In tears when his new work was finished, he decided to call it his "Ashokan Farewell."

The following year, he recorded it with his band. Not long after, Public Broadcasting's Ken Burns heard it and asked if he might use it for a documentary he was planning on the Civil War, and the rest, as they say, is history.

Linking this wispy, plaintive melody to Major Ballou's heart-rending letter was Burns's brilliant inspiration, and SWCP feels that the combination is highly appropriate to the solemn events that we remember tonight.

This is not the first time we've presented the fruits of Brahms's late-in-life collaboration with clarinetist Richard Mühlfeld - the aging, bearded man who said he was through with chamber music and the handsome young one he insisted on dubbing his Fraülein Klarinette. But we've never before substituted the astringent sound of a viola in place of a clarinet (it was published both ways) to realize this wonderfully imaginative trio.

In this unusually fresh work, Brahms anticipates the advent of jazz in experimenting with rhythm. Avoiding the traditionally strong downbeats of conventional music where possible, he syncopates the rhythmic flow - one instrument has sole responsibility for the first beat of each measure, which then challenges the others to find their way. The first movement, a mildly aggressive allegro, and slow, lyrical adagio are both full of delicious syncopations, followed by the interlude of a charming Viennese ländler. The crowning finale is a fiery rondo in which a 2/4 beat alternates with 6/8 or 9/8, adding more than a touch of Gypsy spice. This pure classic Brahms is among the most enjoyable works in the chamber canon.


The Sixty-Seventh Concert

Thursday, August 15, 2002, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Rosemarie Houghton and Joyce Bouvier, sopranos

Jose Luis Sanchez, tenor

David Ehrlich, piano

The Program:

THE FOUR SEASONS:

A potpourri of opera, lieder, and pop

in memory of Sue Goetz Ross


The Sixty-Sixth Concert

Thursday, July 11, 2002, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

THE WESTWOOD QUARTET:

Patricia Cochran and Cecilie Jones, violin

Robert Huesmann, viola

Jan Timbers, 'cello

The Program:

Adagio & Fugue, K. 546 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Quartet #64, #1 by Josef Haydn

Quartet #1 by Bela Bartok


The Sixty-Fourth Concert

Tuesday, May 21, 2002, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Take Ariga, cello

Jason Koczur, horn

Elizabeth Lawrence, soprano

Allison Hughes, mezzo

Jose Luis Sanchez, tenor

David Ehrlich, piano

The Program:

Fantasy Pieces for Horn and Piano, op. 73 by Robert Schumann (1810-56)

Delicamente e con espressione - Vivace, leggiero - Allegro con brio

Sonata in A for Cello and Piano, op. 69 by Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)

Allegro ma non tanto - Scherzo. Allegro molto - Adagio cantabile - Allegro vivace

INTERMISSION

W.A. Mozart (1756-91)

1. Ridente la calma, K. 249
2. Luise und seine Briefe, K. 281
3. Abendempfindung

Johannes Brahms (1833-97)

1. Geheimnis, op. 71, #3
2. Von ewiger Liebe, op. 43, #1
3. Vergebliches Ständchen, op. 84, #4

Umberto Giordano (1867-1948)

Amor ti vieta (Fedora)
Come un bel di di maggio (Andrea Chénier)

Nuit d'ivresse (Les Troyens) by Hector Berlioz (1803-69)

Auf dem Strom (published as op. 119) by Franz Schubert (1797-1828)

About the Artists:

Taka Ariga worked closely with Stephen Kates at the Peabody Conservatory while pursuing engineering degrees. Also an avid pianist and conductor, he counts classical music as a major part of his professional life as a consultant. Passionate about chamber music, Taka often collaborates with Kates, Herbert Greenberg, Geroge Lucktenberg, and Jane Bastien.

Jason Koczur is a Northern Virginian returned from 7 years of horn study, 5 in Boston with Eric Ruske and Richard Menaul and 2 in London with Michael Thompson and Richard Watkins. Currently he's working with Edwin Thayer of the NSO while free-lancing in Allentown and Palm Beach.

Attention to detail and joy in making music are two things Elizabeth Lawrence shares with students in her capacity as director of Madrigals at Madeira School. A veteran performer, she holds a DMA from Peabody and masters from Illinois-Champaign. Among Beth's special passions are Mozart symphonies, Jane Austen novels, and her dog Princess Sniffy.

Allison Hughes joins us for the second time tonight. Bachelor of Music from the University of Central Florida, she sings regularly with the Master Chorale and recently gave a most impressive recital at the Lyceum in Alexandria. Best of all, she simply adores Brahms! Jose Luis Sanchez is the self-propelled product of many voice teachers and coaches, workshops and master classes. With a repertoire including art songs, opera, oratorio, and zarzuela, he's sung in New York City and Freiburg, Germany. Of his art, he says, "When I work, God respects me, but when I sing He loves me."

David Ehrlich learned the piano from his father, Richard, in Boston, starting at the age of 6. Since discovering (at 7) he wasn't destined to be the next Horowitz, he's resigned himself to just being a musical amateur, studying with Matthew van Hoose and playing for friends in venues like Eugene, Ore.; Tiburon, Calif.; New York City; and Nagydorog, Hungary.


The Sixty-Third Concert

Thursday, April 25, 2002, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

John Kaboff, violoncello

Alfred Clark, piano

The Program:

Arpeggione Sonata by Franz Schubert

Sonata in d minor, Op. 100 by Johannes Brahms

Suite Italienne by Igor Stravinsky

Nigun, Pictures of Chadissic Jewish Life by Ernest Bloch

About the Artists:

John Kaboff studied cello at the Universities of Illinois and Indiana, and later in France, Germany, England, and the Sweelinck Conservatory in Amsterdam. A major prize winner in Germany, he's performed with the Concertgebouw and toured Australia. Using his splendid circa 1710 Stradivarius, he teaches a private class of young artists here.

Since receiving degrees from Catholic U., Alfred Clark has put them to good use in Germany, Italy, and the United States as a chamber pianist and vocal accompanist. Among his teachers have been Birgit Nilsson and Rudolf Firkusny. Currently, he accompanies the NSO Youth Fellowship program in recitals, master classes, and the Summer Music Institute.


The Sixty-Second Concert

part of the NATIONAL CHERRY BLOSSOM FESTIVAL

Thursday, April 4, 2002, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Carl Tretter, violin

Miriam Albin Bradley and Alfred Regnery, viola

Taka Ariga, cello

Edward Skidmore, bass

David Ehrlich, piano

Rosemarie Houghton, soprano

The Program:

Aria, "L'amerò sarò constate," from Il re pastore by W.A. Mozart (1756-91)

Sextet in D for piano and strings, op. 110 by Felix Mendelssohn (1809-47)

1. Allegro vivace - 2. Adagio - 3. Minuetto. Agitato - 4. Allegro vivace con fuoco

INTERMISSION

Song, "Die Forelle" ("The Trout") by Franz Schubert (1797-1828) (words by Christian Schubart)

Quintet, op. 114, for piano and strings ("Trout") by Franz Schubert

1. Allegro vivace - 2. Andante - 3. Scherzo: Presto - 4. Tema é variazioni: Andantino, Allegretto - 5. Tempo giusto

About the Artists:

Music lover and good SWCP friend Carl Tretter enjoys performing on his 1760 Landolfi fiddle in local orchestras and chamber groups and at the Bennington (Vermont) summer chamber workshop. Beginning violin studies at age six, he spent eight summers at the camp in Interlochen. Lawyer/ businessman Carl specializes in real estate and investments.

Miriam Albin (only recently Bradley) began her formal musical studies on the piano in Cairo, continuing later on viola with the NSO's Murray Labman. At the U. of Richmond, she earned degrees in mathematics and music, studying with Honggang Li of the Shanghai Quartet. A performed in many venues, in her spare time she also researches folk songs.

Alfred Regnery has played violin and viola for too many years (he says), currently chamber music in Alexandria and regular concerts in Madison County, Virginia. Daytimewise, lawyer/publisher Al specializes in what he likes to call "provocative nonfiction."

Taka Ariga worked closely with Stephen Kates at the Peabody Conservatory while pursuing engineering degrees. Also an avid pianist and conductor, he counts classical music as an integral part of his professional life as a consultant. Passionate about chamber music, Taka frequently collaborates with musicians the stature of Herbert Greenberg, Stephen Kates, George Lucktenberg, and Jane Bastien.

Twice degreed from the University of Michigan, Ed Skidmore went on to do a short stint with the U.S. Air Force Band, followed by a much longer one (thirty-six years) with the National Symphony. His magnificent huge black instrument is a circa 1570 Amati.

David Ehrlich learned the piano from his father, Richard, in Boston, starting at the age of six. Since discovering (at 7) he wasn't destined to be the next Horowitz, he's resigned himself to life as a musical amateur, studying with Matthew van Hoose and playing for friends in venues like Eugene, Ore.; Tiburon, Cal.; New York City; and Nagydorog, Hungary.

Our charming friend Rosemarie Houghton is from Pittsburgh, where she sang with its Opera. Locally, she often appears with Coral Cantigas, a Latin American chamber choir, and teaches voice at both Catholic and NVCC. Her latest triumph was as soloist in a presentation of the works of contemporary Mexican composer Marcela Rodriguez.

Notes on the Program:

Tonight's concert showcases the early talents of three prodigious young men. The Mozart aria, an ardent declaration of love, is from an rarely heard opera of the master's nineteenth year; the Mendelssohn sextet is the work of a precocious fifteen-year-old; and Schubert penned his fabled Trout at the ripe old age of twenty.

In tackling the Mendelssohn, our ensemble approaches orchestral stature, with the critical exception that there's no conductor. That being the case, the risk of things coming apart increases dramatically. So save for a few florid violin passages, the strings are reduced to simple ensemble playing, thereby allowing the pianist to have a very good time indeed. A caution, though: as the action on modern pianos is typically heavier than those of the early nineteenth century, the furious tempos indicated in the score are not always possible. However, we expect to try very hard!

Schubert's sparkling Trout is doubtless the most familiar piece in the chamber canon. Composed in 1819, it originated as music prepared for a casual evening among friends. The idea of setting his own song, written two years earlier on Schubart's poem of the same name, was suggested by his aristocratic friend Sylvester Paumgartner, an amateur cellist. In fact, the first performance was held at Steyr, Paumgartner's palatial estate outside Vienna. The song (see white sheet for text and translation) appears in the fourth movement as the theme for a set of variations.

Why is the Trout in five movements? We don't know -- it may be because there were five friends, and each of the five needed a movement to fully express himself! We do know that its unusual instrumentation (a double bass instead of a second violin) is at least part of what produces the deliciously cavernous tonal effect. In any event, due to the intricate writing and glittering filigree that give bravura opportunities to each of the five players, this charming bit of froth is often associated with such high-spirited celebrations as those honoring the magnificent Japanese cherry trees whose glorious blossoms grace our city for the ninetieth year.

We could say more, but it's a lot more fun to simply listen and ENJOY!


The Sixty-First Concert

Thursday, February 21, 2002, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Mary Josie Blanchard, flute

Jerry Schwarz, clarinet

Martha Strickland, soprano

David Ehrlich & Graham Down, piano

The Program:

Haydn, La Roxolane, Air and Variations

Mozart, Concerto for Flute and Harp, K.299

Songs for soprano

Brahms, Clarinet Sonata, op. 121b


The Sixtieth Concert

Thursday, January 22, 2002, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

The Ironwood Recorders

Joyce Bouvier and Sue Goetz Ross

The Program:

Songs and Dances for Recorders and Voice


The Fifty-Ninth Concert

Wednesday, December 20, 2001, 7:30 p.m.

The Program:

Christmas Music


The Fifty-Eighth Concert

Wednesday, November 14, 2001, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Elise Baker, violin

Allison Hughes, contralto

David Reiner, oboe

Jerry Schwarz, clarinet

Alan Karnovitz, bassoon

David Ehrlich, piano

The Program:

Fantasia in D minor, K. 397 by W.A. Mozart (1756-91)

Rhapsody for Alto, op. 53 by Johannes Brahms (1833-97)

Sonata for Oboe and Piano by Francis Poulenc (1899-1963)

Elegie - Vivace - Deploration

INTERMISSION

Six Romanian Dances by Bela Bartók (1885-1945)

Jocul cu bátá - Brául - Pe loc - Buciumeana - Poarcá románeascá - Manuntelul

Trio Pathétique in D minor by Mikhail Glinka (1803-57)

Allegro - Scherzo. Presto - Larghetto - Allegro risoluto

About the Artists:

No stranger to the D.C. music scene, Elise Baker has tagged along after her violist mother and cellist father for a decade. Twelfth-grader Elise studies with Ronda Cole and Jody Gatwood, soloing with the McLean Orchestra, Fairfax and Arlington symphonies, Landon Symphonette, and Rock Creek Chamber Players. She last appeared with us in a memorable reading of the Brahms G major sonata.

Allison Hughes joins us for the first time tonight. A bachelor of music from the U. of Central Florida, she sings regularly with the Master Chorale and has just given a most impressive recital at the Lyceum in Alexandria.

David Reiner graduated from American University, where he majored in music and served as principal oboe in the AU orchestra. He plans to continue playing in the area and pursue further musical degrees. A Civil War renactor in season, Dave's happy at the moment just playing for food.

Southwest Chamber stalwart Jerry Schwarz began his musical studies at age 10 in Los Angeles. A teacher at American University and avid chamber musician, he's also appeared with the D.C. Community Orchestra and Rock Creek Woodwind Quintet.

Alan Karnovitz is an environmental consultant who, after a lengthy hiatus from playing music, returned to the bassoon eight years ago, studying with the NSO's Truman Harris and playing with the Pan-American and McLean symphonies.

David Ehrlich learned the piano from his father, Richard, in Boston, starting at the age of six. Since discovering (at seven) that he wasn't destined to be the next Horowitz, he's resigned himself to life as a musical amateur, studying with Marilyn Neeley and playing for friends in Eugene, Ore.; Milton, Mass.; Tiburon, Cal.; New York City; and Nagydorog, Hungary.

Notes on the Program:

There's sadness in every work of Mozart, superficially joyful though it may seem. This lovely, highly evocative short piece, a mini-symphony of its own, moves easily from andante to adagio to presto before finally settling into a gentle allegretto.

Brahms's Rhapsody for Contralto, Men's Chorus, and Orchestra is a sublimely masterful melding of music and text that realized his own somber mood in the year 1869.

Much has often been made of the composer's relationship with Clara Schumann, the widow of his mentor Robert. However, considerably less is known of his infatuation with Clara's daughter Julie, whom he worshiped from afar. The lovely, fragile Julie, 17 years old at the time she so fascinated Brahms, was in fact a sickly child who did not live to the age of 23. Yet such was his delicacy (or inability to declare himself) that he never made her aware of his passion, so it was neither returned nor rejected.

To Brahms' horror, he had to learn from a third party while away from Vienna of her engagement to a minor nobleman whom he considered woefully unworthy of her. And this news threw him into a fit of depression which he could only assuage by finding an equally depressing text (from Goethe's Harzreise in Winter, culling its most heart-rending passages and setting them to the saddest music he could summon. He then swore his friends to silence, insisting that they never reveal his reason for writing it to either Clara or her daughter.

Slightly misnamed, this rhapsody is actually a meditation on misery, a marriage of music and text that is very little short of perfection. The gloomy heaths high in the Harz Mountains, picturesque enough in June (see painting above) but bleak and inhospitable in November, are the quintessential setting where this unhappy soul can indulge his bitter self-pity to his heart's content. "Balsam is poison, for he whom the hatred of men has driven from the fullness of love." The harsh, crashing tremolos of the opening, rather like the introit of a somber religious ceremony, give way to an eloquent, meditative aria that is the stuff of despair, filled with rising and falling cries of the utmost melancholy. Some resolution is possible in the third verse, in which the omniscient mother soloist (a frequent figure in Brahms's music) is normally accompanied by a four-part men's chorus, pleads to whatever powers might prevail to assuage the poor man's suffering, though such a happy conclusion appears unlikely.

Poulenc wrote extensively for voice; when he turns to the wind family, he's still writing for the voice. More elegy than sonata, this oboe piece is arguably the saddest piece in the literature. Though its dedication is to his contemporary Sergei Prokofiev, it can be considered a generic lament for the dead.

Bartók's six bumptious Romanian Dances are a pure tour de force for the violin - the piano is merely along for the ride. The somewhat bacchanalian tunes are folk melodies he collected in the Transylvanian region of Romania (part of Hungary prior to World War I) and used often throughout his musical output.

The oddly named Glinka trio (we find nothing pathetic about it!) was first done here by the ensemble Contrasts, with the bassoon part transcribed for the viola. Another oddity: though the composer is known as the father of Russian music, we find precious little about it that's Russian, either. An early work, it reflects his time spent as a young man amid the salons of Rome and Naples.


The Fifty-Seventh Concert

Wednesday, October 10, 2001, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Dawn Culbertson, lutenist

The Program:

Lute music of Elizabethan England and Scotland


The Fifty-Sixth Concert

Tuesday, September 25, 2001, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Laura Bachmann, soprano

Carolyn Zolbe, alto

Charles Bachmann, tenor

Paul Danaher, bass

Elizabeth Dyson and David Ehrlich, piano

John Kaboff, violoncello

Alfred Clark, piano

The Program:

Liebeslieder Waltzes by Johannes Brahms (1833-97)

1. Rede, Mädchen, all zu liebes
2. Am Gesteine rauscht die Flut
3. O die Frauen, wie als Wonne tauen
4. Wie des Abends schöne Röte
5. Die grüne Hopfen ranke
6. Ein kleine, hübsche Vögel
7. Wohl schön bewandt war es
8. Wenn so lind dein Auge mir
9. Am Donau Strande da steht ein Haus
10. O, wie sanft die Quelle sich
11. Nein, es ist nicht auszukommen
12. Schlösser, auf! und mache Schlosser
13. Vögelein, durschrauscht die Luft
14. Sieh, wie ist die Welle klar
15. Nachtigall, sie singt so schön
16. Ein dunkeler Schwach ist Liebe
17. Nicht wandle, mein Licht
18. Es bebet das Gesträuche

INTERMISSION

Cello Concerto No. 2 in D minor by Camille Saint-Saens (1835-1924)

Allegro moderato e maestoso - Allegro non troppo

About the Artists:

Laura Bachmann delighted a Carnegie Hall audience with her solo rendition of Pierné's Children's Crusade (with the National Symphony), not to mention ours with an imitation of a cat. Otherwise, she sings regularly around town, especially with the Bach Consort and Washington Chorus.

Carolyn Zolbe: lifetime musician. First came singing, then whistling, piano lessons, school trombone, chorus, and 28 years as an elementary school teacher, singing daily with her students and mounting an annual slam-dunk musical. 27 years in the Paul Hill Chorale's professional core.

Charles "Chip" Bachmann also sings in the Washington Chorus and Bach Consort in between soloing at area churches and cameo roles with the American Music Stage in Annandale.

Born in England, Paul Danaher sang with the BBC radio chorus and later with the English National Opera. After two seasons at the Cantiere Internazionale di Montepulciano, he moved to Germany, where he recorded with Westdeutsche and Hessische Rundfunk before a 20-year hiatus doing narrations and voiceovers.

Elizabeth Dyson embarked on a second career as a chamber musician after 30 years of practicing law. Currently a pianist at the Washington School of Ballet, she has accompanied the Odyssey Opera Theater and also taught ballet accompaniment at the Levine School of Music.

David Ehrlich learned the piano from his father, Richard, in Boston, starting at the age of six. Since discovering (at 7) he wasn't destined to be the next Horowitz, he's resigned himself to life as a musical amateur, studying with Marilyn Neeley and playing for friends in venues like Eugene, Ore.; Tiburon, Cal.; New York City; and Nagydorog, Hungary.

John Kaboff studied cello at the Universities of Illinois and Indiana, and later in France, Germany, England, and the Sweelinck Conservatory in Amsterdam. A major prize winner in Germany, he's performed with the Concertgebouw and toured Australia. Using his splendid circa 1710 Stradivarius, he teaches a private class of young artists here.

Since receiving degrees from Catholic U., Alfred Clark has put them to good use in Germany, Italy, and the United States as a chamber pianist and vocal accompanist. Among his teachers have been Birgit Nilsson and Rudolf Firkusny. Currently, he accompanies the NSO Youth Fellowship program in recitals, master classes, and the Summer Music Institute.

Notes on the Program:

Brahms took years to write his first symphony. While he was an orchestra composer in waiting, he honed his musical skills by writing charming "hausmusik" pieces intended for home pleasure. Setting the sweet, sentimental texts of Daumer's Polydora verses to faintly Slavic melodies with a distinctly Viennese spin, he succeeded in reflecting the emotions of joy and anguish experienced by young lovers everywhere.

During his lifetime, he earned more from these little waltzes than anything else he ever wrote. In their day they were the equivalent of the popular ballads that enchanted lovers the world over until our own, when they've been so rudely supplanted by something called rock.

It's a bit sad that virtually all we know of Saint-Saens' music is the Carnival of the Animals and the Bacchanale from Samson and Delilah. So much more of this elegant Frenchman's work is worth hearing. A case in point is this unknown second concerto for cello and orchestra whose solo part is so complex that much of it has to be written on two staves (or memorized by the performer).

The work has only two movements, the first of which is a sort of polonaise with a virtuoso sostenuto which is in effect a cadenza. The second is a more traditional scherzo, one loaded with double stops (two notes on two strings at once), which are both the bane and the road to glory for the soloist.


The Fifty-Fifth Concert

Wednesday, August 22, 2001, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Joyce Bouvier, Rosemarie Houghton, Sue Goetz Ross, Bruce Crane and Jose Luis Sanchez, singers

Linda Bryant, flute

Jerry Schwarz, clarinet

Loyd Newman, bass

David Ehrlich, piano

Pauline LeMarie, reader

The Program:

Songs About Flowers


The Fifty-Third Concert

Thursday, May 24, 2001, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Elise Baker, violin

Jose Luis Sanchez, baritone

Wendy Hodge, oboe

David Ehrlich, piano

and John Kaboff's "Heavenly Bows" cello choir

The Program:

Cantata 82, "Ich habe genug" by J. S. Bach

INTERMISSION

Sonata for violin and piano in G major, op. 100 by Johannes Brahms

Vivace ma non troppo - Adagio - Allegro molto moderato

About the Artists:

Jose Luis Sanchez is the self-propelled product of many voice teachers and coaches, workshops and master classes. His wide repertoire of art songs, opera, oratorio, and zarzuela, has been heard in New York City, Freiburg, Germany, and in our town as well, with the National Men's Chorus. In his words, "When I work, God respects me ... but when I sing He loves me."

Elise Baker is 15 years old. She comes of a distinguished musical lineage: her father is a prominent cellist around Washington, and her recently deceased mother played violin and viola for the Bach Consort and others. She was first violin in last year's Christmas concert.

Born and raised in Huntsville, Alabama, Wendy Hodge graduated from that university. Having played with the Huntsville and Tuscaloosa symphonies and Red Mountain Chamber Orchestra, she's now headed for a Master's at the U. of Maryland. Her greatest thrill to date was sharing a stage with William Warfield.

"Impresario" of this series, David Ehrlich learned the piano from his father, Richard, in Boston, starting at the age of six. Since discovering (at seven) he wasn't destined to be Horowitz, he's resigned himself to life as a musical amateur, studying with Marilyn Neeley and playing for friends in venues like Eugene, Oregon; Toba, Japan; Tiburon, California; New York City; and Nagydorog, Hungary.

John Kaboff studied cello at the Universities of Illinois and Indiana, and later in France, Germany, England, and the Sweelinck Conservatory in Amsterdam. A major prize winner in Germany, he's performed with such prominent European orchestras as the Concertgebouw and toured Australia. Using his splendid circa 1710 Stradivarius, he teaches the private class of young artists whom we hear tonight.

Program Notes:

Beginning actually before his 27-year tenure at the Thomaskirche in Leipzig, Bach was regularly called upon to produce church cantatas for each week of the year, using whatever instrumental and vocal forces might be at his disposal. Many of the texts, (better left untranslated!) have to do with the "joys" of death and dying, and #82 is no exception. Aria titles like "I have had enough," or "I rejoice at my impending death" belie the joyous melodies and lively contrapuntal accompaniments.

However, when it comes to Brahms's three violin sonatas (the last of which we performed last month), it is hard to have enough. A consummate craftsman, he constantly revised his work, destroying anything that did not meet his rigorous self-imposed standards, so we are hearing precisely what he intended us to hear.

Two songs, "Regenlied" (Rain) and "Nachklang" (Echo), define the sweetly somber mood of the impassioned outer movements; the graceful adagio between is a thoughtful elegy.


The Fifty-Second Concert

Thursday, April 26, 2001, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Legacy Brass

Maryland Brass Ensemble

The Program:

The music of Gabrieli, Debussy, Stanley, Franck, Bohme, Cheetham, Bowie and Leroy Anderson


The Fifty-First Concert

A SALUTE TO THE CHERRY BLOSSOMS

(an official Cherry Blossom Festival event)

Thursday, April 5, 2001, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Jenny Cieplak, violin

Amanda Scheetz, viola

Jerry Schwarz, clarinet

Rosemarie Houghton, soprano

David Ehrlich, piano

The Program:

(to Mrs. Kaoru Mikimoto)

"Notturno," adagio for violin, viola, and piano, op. 148 by Franz Schubert

"Märschenerzählungen" (Fairy Tales) by Robert Schumann

INTERMISSION

Ihr habt nun Traurigkeit, aria from Ein Deutsches Requiem, op. 45 by Johannes Brahms

Sonata for violin and piano in D minor, op. 108 by Johannes Brahms

1. Allegro - 2. Adagio - 3. Scherzo: Un poco presto e con sentimento - 4. Presto agitato

Our Artists:

Jenny Cieplak, violin, is a student of Robert Gerle at Catholic University. Having played with the Mid-Atlantic Symphony, Mt. Vernon Chamber Orchestra, and Washington Pro Musica, Jenny plans to begin studying for a Master's in violin performance next year.

Coached by Lisa Ponton of the President's Own marine band, Amanda Scheetz is a busy woman: 1) working toward a B.A. in viola performance at NVCC; 2) playing with several local chamber groups; and 3) coaching her three children, Spencer, 11; Katherine, 8; and Alexander, 6, in music. This summer she plans a week of chamber study in Austria.

Rosemarie Ruiz Houghton hails from Pittsburgh, where she sang with its Opera. Since moving here, she's sung with the National Symphony. She also appears with Coral Cantigas, a Latin American chamber choir, and teaches voice at Catholic and NVCC.

David Ehrlich learned the piano from his father, Richard, in Boston, starting at the age of six. Soon realizing he wasn't destined to be Horowitz, he's resigned himself to playing for charities and friends, in venues as diverse as Eugene, Oregon; Tiburon, California; N.Y. City; and Nagydorog, Hungary.

Notes on the Program:

Schubert was not noted for the orderliness of his life. This enigmatic trio was published posthumously under a title - not his - suggesting a slow, languorous piece suitable for the evening. But why? Perhaps he intended it to stand by itself; perhaps it is a fragment of a third four-movement trio which he never wrote. In any case, it's a great, alternately contemplative and majestic, joy-ride for the piano, with strings allowed to share in the ride.

Though untitled, Schumann's charming Fairy Tales are among the more delightful products of this brilliant but sadly flawed mind. The father of seven children and contemporary of the Grimm brothers, he loved to write music that was not necesarily for children that evoked elves, toy soldiers, river gods, and other similar denizens of the world of make-believe. We play three of a set of four, all set for the sonorities of clarinet, viola, and piano.

Brahms's glorious German Requiem is a choral piece. Written in part as a memorial to his mother, it is an eloquent statement of the affirmation of life. The soprano aria was actually composed a few months after the original work's premiere. Its consoling words include: "Ye are now sorrowful, but ye shall see me again. I will gladden your hearts and no man shall take away your joy. I will comfort you, as one whom his own mother comforts. Look upon me; ye know that for a little while labor and sorrow were mine, but I have found comfort at the last."

This splendid D minor violin sonata, the last of his three, is the product of a placid summer by a Swiss lake, far distant from the wild gypsy mood of its first and last movements. In turn capricious, brilliant, and tender, it is among the composer's most eloquent works, conceived in the grand manner for both instruments and intended to be performed with ... cautious abandon.


The Fifth Anniversary/Fiftieth Concert

Thursday, March 15, 2001, 7:30 p.m.

The Program:

Intermezzo, op. 118, #3 by Johannes Brahms

David Ehrlich, piano

Choral Prelude by J.S. Bach

Paul Weiss, trumpet

Choral Prelude (unaccompanied) by J.S. Bach

John Kaboff, cello

Duos for piano and clarinet by Robert Schumann

Liz Dyson, piano; Jerry Schwarz, clarinet

Kol Nidrei by Professor D. Ehrlich

Carl Tretter, violin

Cantique de Jean Racine by Gabriel Fauré

Mary Josie Blanchard, Carl Blackwell, flutes

Trio for oboe, bassoon, and piano: Adagio by Francis Poulenc

Wendy Hodge, oboe; Mark Noble, bassoon

Romanian Dances by Bela Bartók

Nayiri Poochikian, violin

INTERMISSION

Romance for oboe, op. 94 by Robert Schumann

Wendy Hodge

Fairy Tales, op 132, #4 by Robert Schumann

Amanda Scheetz, viola; Jerry Schwarz

Capriol Suite by Peter Warlock

Ironwood Recorders

La Rosa and la Sauce by Carlo Guastavino

Jose Luis Sanchez, baritone

"Sphinx" by Kate Blackburn/Debbie Hinson-Bridges

Joyce Bouvier, soprano; Tom Blackburn, cello

Suite for Flute and Jazz Piano (1974) by Claude Bolling

Linda Bryant, flute

Andante in C major for horn by Richard Strauss

Jason Koczur, horn

Der Hirt auf dem Felsen by Franz Schubert

Rosemarie Houghton, soprano; Jerry Schwarz

Program Notes:

It's astonishing how time passes, isn't it? Four years ago, in need of a Washington venue for a talented ensemble of European musicians, we turned to our friend Father John Talbott here at Saint Augustine's to ask if we might rent the church with its sensational acoustics and excellent piano. Not only did he accede graciously to our request, he said we could have it free as long as we did not charge admission. Thereby assured of a home but with no money, we set out to find an audience. Pulling in every possible chit, we gathered 125 curious presumably music-starved Southwesters and Post critic Joseph McClellan.

At the conclusion of that concert, we asked the audience if they'd be willing to support a series of monthly chamber music programs admittedly performed by amateurs. Receiving an enthusiastic affirmative answer, we did a shaky but whole-hearted Brahms Horn Trio the next month, and we were off. And now, four years later, you're all still with us. Bless you all for your support -- moral and financial!

In addition to our fifth anniversary, tonight's also marks our 50th consecutive performance. More than 70 singers and instrumentalists have performed with us, as well as a dozen outside groups. The list of works we've done (humbly posted outside), while far from encyclopedic, is one that any performing ensemble would be proud of, and though we can't individually say that every single performance was perfect (several weren't!), we are pleased to have brought a wide representation of the broad chamber music repertoire to our community.

We are all deeply grateful to our three partners without whose help none of this would be possible. The first is Joyce Bouvier, who's turned countless pages flawlessly, even on evenings in which she's been part of the performance; next is our talented recording engineer Paul Moon, who puts us regularly on disc; last and best is my wonderful wife, Barbara, who has graciously contributed refreshments and flowers for all 50 concerts.


The Forty-Seventh Concert

Wednesday, December 20, 2000, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Rosemarie Houghton, soprano

Stephen Roberts, baritone

Sue Goetz Ross, mezzo-soprano

Paul Weiss, trumpet

Amanda Scheetz, viola

Jerry Schwarz, clarinet

and the Southwest Chamber Music Players "Orchestra"

& John Kaboff's Bow Lightlys and the Potomac Mandoolin Ensemble

The Program:

Wachet auf, ruft' uns die Stimme by J.S. Bach (arr. Zoltan Kocsis)

Grosse Herr, from the Christmas Oratorio by J.S. Bach

Selection of Christmas Carols, Traditional (arr. John Kaboff):

Dona nobis pacem, German canon
Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring by J.S. Bach
Sheep may Safely Graze by J.S. Bach
Legend by P.I. Tschaikowsky
O come, Emanuel, 13th century plainsong
Jingle Bells, Traditional

Exsultate, Jubilate, K. 165 by W.A. Mozart

INTERMISSION

The Potomac Mandolin Ensemble:

Concerto for 4 violins by Telemann

Adagio - Allegro - Grave - Allegro

Study #9 by Fernando Sor

My heart ever faithful by J.S. Bach

Carol of the Bells, Traditional

Traditional Carols:

Adeste Fideles (arr. D. Wilcocks)
Silent Night (Gruber/Mohr)
Geistliches Wiegenlied (Brahms)
In the Bleak Midwinter (Traditional)
Hark the Herald Angels (Mendelssohn)
Cantique de Noel (Adolphe Adam)

Tuesday Concert Series

The Church of the Epiphany at 1317 G Street, NW

Tuesday, November 14, 2000, 12:10 p.m.

Featuring:

Jenny Cieplak, violin

Jerry Schwarz, clarinet

Wendy Hodge, oboe

Mark Noble, bassoon

Rosemary Houghton, soprano

David Ehrlich, piano

The Program:

Variations for oboe and piano by François-Adrién Boieldieu

Nell by Gabriel Fauré

Suite, op. 159b (1936) by Darius Milhaud

Ouverture - Divertissement - Jeux - Moderé - Vif

Lia's Recitative and Aria, from L'Enfant Prodigue by Claude Debussy

Trio for oboe, bassoon and piano (1926) by Francis Poulenc

I. Lent. Presto - II. Andante con moto - III. Rondo. Très vif

Our Artists:

JENNY CIEPLAK is a violin student of Robert Gerle. Having performedwith the Washington Symphony, Mt. Vernon Chamber Orchestra, and WashingtonPro Musica, she plans to begin studying for a Master's in violin performancenext year.

JERRY SCHWARZ began his musical studies at age 10 in Los Angeles, wherehe was the principal clarinet of the UC-Berkeley Symphony. A teacher atAmerican University and avid chamber musician, he has appeared with the D.C. Community Orchestra and the Rock Creek Woodwind Quintet.

WENDY HODGE, born and raised in Huntsville, Alabama, graduated fromthe University of Alabama, and cut her teeth with the Huntsville and Tuscaloosasymphonies and the Red Mountain Chamber Orchestra. Her greatest thrillto date (next to playing with SWCMP) was sharing a stage with William Warfield.

MARK NOBLE has two loves in his life. One is teaching chemistry, whichhe does every day of the school year at Georgetown Day School. The otheris playing his bassoon, which he's done almost every day since he was bigenough to hold one.

ROSEMARIE RUIZ HOUGHTON hails from Pittsburgh, where she sang with itsOpera. Since moving here, she's appeared with the National Symphony andCoral Cantigas, and teaches voice at Catholic University and Northen VirginiaCommunity College.

DAVID EHRLICH learned the piano from his father, Richard, in Boston,starting at the age of six. Since realizing he wasn't destined to be Horowitz,he has resigned himself to a life of musical amateurship, studying withEva Pierrou and Marilyn Neeley and performing gladly for charities andfriends, in venues as diverse as Eugene, Oregon; Tiburon, California; NewYork City; and Nagydorog, Hungary.


The Forty-Sixth Concert

Thursday, November 9, 2000, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

The Modern Brass Trio:

Lisa Emrich, horn; Kirsten Lies-Warfield, trombone; Blair Goins, tuba

Wendy Hodge, oboe

Mark Noble, bassoon

David Ehrlich, piano

The Program:

Three English Madrigals:

Since Robin Hood by Thomas Weelkes (1575-1623)

Lady, if I through Grief by Thomas Morley (1557-1602)

Springtime mantleth every bough by Thomas Morley (allarr. Goins)

Three Dances by Blair Goins (1962-)

Concertino for French horn and low brass by Blair Goins

I - II - III - IV

Trio for oboe, bassoon, and piano by Francis Poulenc (1899-1963)

I. Lent. Presto - II. Andante con moto - III. Rondo. Très vif

INTERMISSION

Sonate da chiesa a tré, op. 3, #2 by Arcangelo Corelli (1653-1713) (arr. Roland Lemêtre)

Grave - Allegro - Adagio - Allegro

Mazurka, op. 6, #1 by Frédéric Chopin (1810-49)(arr. Goins)

Triangles by John Stephens (1951-)

One hand, one heart by Leonard Bernstein (1918-90) (arr.Goins)

Our Artists:

Lisa Emrich actively free-lances in the Washington area, performingwith, among others, the Fairfax and Prince William symphonies and the NationalGallery and Baltimore Opera orchestras. Playing a natural horn, she's alsoappeared with Washington Bach Consort and Kantorei. Before moving here,she played with prominent organizations in Owensboro (Ky) and Evansville and Bloomington (Ind.)

A native of Fargo, N.D., Kirsten Lies-Warfield has degrees fromthe Lawrence (Wisc.) University and Indiana, where she studied with M. Dee Stewart. Subsequent study in brass pedagogy was suspended when shejoined the U.S. Army Band as the unit's first woman trombonist.

Two years after Blair Goins completed his B.Music degree at theEastman School, he was commissioned by the U. of Vermont to compose a workfor full orchestra in celebration of Martin Luther King, Jr. Since then,he's played with the Monumental Brass Quintet, Whitworth Brass Ensemble, and Takoma Park Symphony, as well as teaching musical theory at the DukeEllington School.

Wendy Hodge, born and raised in Huntsville, Alabama, cut herteeth with the Huntsville and Tuscaloosa symphonies. Her greatest thrill to date (next to playing with SWCMP) was sharing a stage with William Warfield.

Mark Noble has two loves. One is teaching chemistry, which hedoes every day at Georgetown Day School; the other is playing bassoon,which he's done almost every day since he was big enough to hold one.

Impresario of this series since 1997, David Ehrlich learned thepiano from his father, Richard, at the age of six. Realizing he wasn't destined to be Horowitz, he now plays for charities and friends - fromWashington (D.C.) and Boston to California, Oregon, and Hungary.

Program Notes:

Blair Goins's Dances were written especially for the Modern Jazz Trio,and this performance represents its world premiere. Blair has this to sayabout his compositional style: "When I set out to compose any new work, I do not map out a formal structure or "sketch" of the piece before writing the specific notes. Instead, I create the first musical passage, and then proceed to compose, measure by measure, what follows. Where I land at any given moment is as much a surprise to me during the process as it is tothe first-time listener. I trust it will be a pleasant surprise!" Mostof the rest of the brass trio's program is familiar, or at least worksof familiar composers, and they will introduce their music briefly. However,we find the liner notes from the DGG recording of Poulenc's wonderfullyplayful trio so fascinating that we've reproduced them.

Chamber music embraces a wide range of styles, from the loftiest string quartet writing to character pieces and divertimenti whose primeaim is to entertain. In the chamber works of Francis Poulenc it is thelatter element that predominates, but as so often in his compositions,a facade of attractiveness can suddenly reveal unexpected pathos. His bestchamber works are always rooted in the character and colors of the instrumentsfor which they are scored. For this reason, winds heavily outweigh stringsin his choice of ensembles, their differentiated personalities fuelinghis imagination more potently than the more impersonal tone-quality ofstrings. Even more significantly, winds, because they are subject to thelimits of human lung capacity, speak in phrases naturally reminiscent ofthe rhythms of breathing, of language. For Poulenc, as for Igor Stravinsky,whom he greatly admired, this anthropomorphic aspect of their sound wasa source of deep fascination. In Poulenc's case, these overtones of thehuman voice had a special significance, as throughout his career he excelledas a composer of songs.

This trio accurately reflects his predilection for wind sonorities. Further, it was relatively early in his career (at age 27) that this medium featured most predominantly. It is against the background of the ballet LesBiches, which he wrote on commission from the famous Russian choreographer Diaghilev, that it might best be viewed. In that score, he did nothingto hide his passionate admiration for Stravinsky's earlier ballet Pulcinella (1920), in which music by 18th-century composers is treated to a tactfuldose of modernist dissonance and accidental displacement. But he broughtanother element to the Stravinsky cocktail, a sentimental expressivenesswhich periodically sweetens the Russian's more acerbic influence; thus,both the spry rhythms and harmonies of the neoclassical Stravinsky andhis own slightly indulgent moments of tenderness inform this work.

In the slow introduction to the first movement, itself a neoclassical allusion to the French overture, the tone is sober and formal. But in the subsequent Allegro, the effervescent charm of the piece is apparent, forexample, in the bravura rising scale in parallel tenths for the winds.With only the interruption of a cadenza-like passage introducing a morelyrical interlude, the entire movement consists of an engaging successionof catchily diatonic themes, perky rhythms, nimble articulation, and colorfulharmonic incidents. The second movement is cast in a more fragile, pensivemood, with a main theme just a tad too cloying for Mozart, but certainlyechoing Classical manners. And in a similar way, the gigue-like finalehas an 18th-century allusion, but the tone is more self-conscious thanthe model. As with the first movement, the delightful proliferation ofthematic material is enough in itself. We scarcely need the rather toocontrived harking back to one of the first-movement themes which Poulencinserted for the sake of structural unity.

- Jeremy Cox, for DGG


The Forty-Fifth Concert

Thursday, October 5, 2000, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Jenny Cieplak, violin

Jerry Schwarz, clarinet

Joyce Bouvier, soprano

David Ehrlich, piano

The Program:

Sonata for violin and piano, op. 1, no. 1 by Ludwig vanBeethoven

Allegro - Andante and variations - Rondo

I dreamt I dwelt in marble halls (from The Bohemian Girl) by Michael Balfe

Sonata for clarinet and piano, op. 129 by Charles Villiers Stanford

Allegro moderato - "Caoine." Adagio - Allegretto

INTERMISSION

O mio babbino caro (from Gianni Schicchi) by GiacomoPuccini

Selve amice, ombrose pianti by Antonio Caldara

Vissi d'arte, vissi d'amore (from Tosca) by Puccini

Suite for trio, op. 157b by Darius Milhaud

Ouverture - Divertissement - Jeu - Moderé - Vif

Our Artists:

Making her SWCP debut tonight, Jenny Cieplak is a student ofRobert Gerle. Having performed with the Washington Symphony, Mt. VernonChamber Orchestra, and Washington Pro Musica, she plans to begin studyingfor a Master's in violin performance next year.

SWCP regular Jerry Schwarz began his musical studies at ageten in Los Angeles. Currently a teacher at American University, avid chambermusician, and father of two more avid chamber musicians, he's also appearedwith the Rock Creek Woodwind Quintet.

Though trained in opera and art songs, Joyce Bouvier has since crossed over to popular music. In between her appearances with SWCMP, she now performs frequently for residents of retirement and nursing homes.

Impresario of this series since 1997, David Ehrlich learned the piano from his father, Richard, at the age of six. Realizing he wasn'tdestined to be Horowitz, he now plays for charities and friends - fromWashington and Boston to California and Hungary.

Program Notes:

Beethoven came to Vienna in 1790 to study with Franz Joseph Haydn, the reigning musical genius of the day, and his earliest work there does notyet reflect the highly individual style that evolved with dramatic improvements in the piano, the violin, and the concert hall. Though this first of histen violin sonatas looks back more to Haydn than it does forward, the melodies are uniquely his.

Sometimes dubbed the English Brahms for his lush late romantic (perhaps Victorian) harmonies, Stanford was actually an Irishman. Entering to Cambridge in 1870, he soon became conductor of the university orchestra and rarelyvisited his homeland. His first love, compositions based on Irish folksongs,for which he won a number of prizes, includes tonight's splendid sonata,and is based on such mournful tunes. The title of the wonderful second-movementdirge means "keening," an uniquely Irish way to lament.

The operatic arias we've chosen tonight include two Puccini favorites, plus, since we're all Irish (or partly so) tonight, one in which both the subject and the composer are Hibernian in origin.

Milhaud exemplifies the playful aspect of some of the French music turned out by a group called "Les Cinq," who had tired of the impressionism ofDebussy. Witty, irreverent, and fun, this delightful five-part work explorescombining instruments considered uncombinable. Be sure to listen for snatchesof the "Lullaby of Broadway!"


The Forty-Fourth Concert

Wednesday, September 13, 2000, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Wendy Hodge, David Reiner, oboe

Betsy Reveal, Jerry Schwarz, clarinet

Cliff Carter, Mark Noble, bassoon

Rosemarie Houghton, soprano

Barbara Showalter, horn

David Ehrlich, piano

The Program:

Wind music by Marcello, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert and Jacob


The Forty-Third Concert

Wednesday, August 16, 2000, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Rosemarie Ruiz Houghton, Sue Goetz Ross, Joyce Bouvier, Bruce Crane

Ironwood Recorder Ensemble

Loyd Newman, bass

David Ehrlich, piano

The Program:

Eine kleine nachtmusik by W.A. Mozart

Nocturne, op. 9, #1 by Frédéric Chopin

Nacht violen (Night violets) by Franz Schubert

Frühlingsnacht (Spring night) by Schubert

Mondnacht (moonlit night) by Robert Schumann

A Nightingale Sang in Berkeley Square by Eric Maschwitz & Manning Sherwin

Moscow Nights by Soloviev-Sedoy

No Moon at All by David Mann & Redd Evans

Sure on this Shining Night by Samuel Barber

Clair de lune, from Suite Bergamasque by Claude Debussy

Chère nuit (Dear night) by Alfred Bachelet

INTERMISSION

Rei glorios (Crusader song) by Gieaut de Bornelh

When the Night Wind Howls (Ruddigore) by Gilbert &Sullivan

Stardust by Mitchell Parrish & Hoagy Carmichael

Wanderers nachtlied (The wanderer's night-song) by Schubert

Velvet Moon by Edgar DeLange & Josef Myrow

After the Ball by Charles K. Harris arr. Douglas Hempel

Shine on, Harvest Moon by Percy Wenrich

Some Enchanted Evening by Rodgers & Hammerstein

Mr. Sandman by Chordettes

Night galliards by Anthony Holborne

It's a Grand Night for Singing by Rodgers & Hammerstein

Our Artists:

Rosemarie Ruiz Houghton hails from Pittsburgh, where she sang with its Opera. Since moving here, she's sung with the National Symphony. She also appears with the Latin American chamber choir Coral Cantigas and teaches voice at Catholic and NVCC.

Dr. Sue Goetz Ross lends us her mellow alto again. A former flutist with a PhD from Columbia, she's performed in six European countries. Athome, she solos regularly, both on her own and with the Washington BachConsort, Carmina, Kantorei, Musica Antiqua, and other organizations specializingin early music.

Trained in opera and art songs, Joyce Bouvier has since crossed over to popular music and now performs regularly for residents of retirement and nursing homes.

Loyd Newman has jazzed things up at local clubs for years. Currently, you can hear him each Friday and Saturday night at the MarketInn.

David Ehrlich learned the piano from his father, Richard, inBoston, starting at the age of six. Since discovering (at 7) he wasn'tdestined to be Horowitz, he's resigned himself to life as a musical amateur,studying with Marilyn Neeley and playing for friends in venues like Eugene,Ore.; Tiburon, Cal.; New York City; and Nagydorog, Hungary.

The Ironwood Recorder Ensemble has been together for a number of years playing music of various styles, notably Baroque and Renaissance. It consists of Doug Martz, Frances Storey, Bruce Crane, and Dan Oliver.


The Forty-Second Concert

Thursday, July 20, 2000, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

The Hunt Quartet

Ray and Diane Cultrera, violins

Kathy Ferger, viola

Tom Blackburn, cello

Stephen Kline, piano

Christian Hummel, flute

The Program:

Three Early Pieces for flute and piano by Lukas Foss

1. Early Song (1944) - 2. Dedication (1944) - 3. Composer's Holiday(1945)

Trio for Flute, Cello and Piano by Bohuslav Martinu

1. Poco allegretto - 2. Adagio - 3. Andante; allegretto scherzando

INTERMISSION

Quintet in A for Piano and Strings by Antonin Dvorak

Allegro ma non troppo - Dumka: Andante con moto - Furiant: Moltovivace - Finale: Allegro

Our Artists:

The Hunt String Quartet (Ray and Diane Cultrera, violins; Kathy Ferger, viola; and Tom Blackburn, cello) was formed in 1993 from membersof the Washington Symphony. They perform throughout the Washington area.

Stephen Kline holds degrees in performance from West Virginia and Catholic universities. He studies with Leander Bien.

Christian Hummel is an astronomer with the U.S. Naval Observatory. Born in Germany, he has studied the flute since age 10, most recently with Karen Johnson at the Levine School. He has performed pieces by Copland,Hindemith, Enesco, and Dutilleux as well as numerous solo and accompaniedworks for interested friends. He's also joined the Hexagon Orchestra atthe Duke Ellington School in its last several performances.

Notes on the Program:

Born Lukas Fuchs in Germany in 1922, Foss conducted the Buffalo Philharmonic for eight years during which he was known for innovative programming, much of it his own compositions. Leaving Buffalo for Brooklyn, and later Milwaukee, he continued to refine his fondness for the avant-garde.

Czech-born Martinu left his homeland to study in Paris with Albert Roussel. Although he was not Jewish, he incurred the Nazis' wrath, and was forcedto flee to New York in 1940 with barely the shirt on his back. Arrivinghere, he was befriended by Serge Koussevitzky, who installed him at theBoston Symphony's summer home in Tanglewood. Though he hoped to returnhome,he found Communism incompatible, and made his living here teaching at Princetonand Curtis, and writing prolifically, generally very difficult music. Tonight'strio, though, is remarkably accessible, with its dashes of Czech folk music,the chic Paris of the '30s, and the elegant neoclassicism of Stravinsky.

Dvorak's magnificent Quintet is a stunning example of chamber musicat its finest, combining a strict classic, almost symphonic, form withbits and snatches of delicious folk tunes from his native Bohemia. Themiddle two movements, the dumka and furiant, reflect, respectively, story-tellingaround a gypsy campfire and a joyous peasant dance. Notable are the splendidcello solo at the opening (later echoed by the violin), the rapidly changingrhythms of the dumka, the sweet bell-like trio of the furiant, and themany other small touches that give this wonderful piece its deserved placeamong the best-loved of the piano/string literature.


The Forty-First Concert

Wednesday, June 14, 2000, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Anna Schwarz, soprano

Miriam Schwarz, cello

Jerry Schwarz, clarinet

Nicholas Fobe, viola

Elizabeth Dyson, Graham Down, piano

The Program:

Six Folksong Settings by Ralph Vaughan Williams

Two German Songs by Louis Spohr

1. Zwiegesang(Dialogue) - 2. Wiegenlied (Cradle Song)

Clarinet Trio, op. 11 (second movement) by Ludwig van Beethoven

Vocalise by Sergei Rachmaninoff

INTERMISSION

Clarinet Sonata in B-flat by Arnold Cooke

Allegro - Scherzando - Adagio ma non troppo - Molto vivace

Four Pieces, op. 83 by Max Bruch

1. Andante - 2. Allegro con moto - 5. Rumanische Melodie - 6. Nachtgesang

Our Artists:

Southwest Chamber regular Jerry Schwarz began his musical studies at age 10 in Los Angeles. A teacher at American University and avid chamber musician, he's also appeared with the D.C. Community Orchestra and RockCreek Woodwind Quintet.

Nicholas Fobe came to the U.S. in 1979 from Belgium to earn a Masters in Music at the Univ. of Indiana and stayed to complete a law degree at Georgetown. A practicing attorney, he enthusiastically blocks out time to play with friends and colleagues.

Anna Schwarz studied voice at the Levine School with CharlesWilliams. Equally comfortable in both cabaret and art songs, she's currentlya drama major at the Univ. of the Arts in Philadelphia.

Miriam Schwarz started cello at age five. Having studied with Martha Vance for the past eight years, she plays in a chamber trio withflute and violin at Levine coached by Karen Johnson.

Elizabeth Dyson embarked on a second career as a chamber musician after 30 years of practicing law. Currently a pianist at the Odyssey Opera Theater and Washington School of Ballet, she has also taught ballet accompaniment at Levine.

Graham Down, a graduate of King's College, Cambridge, and Christchurch, Oxford, is an associate of the Royal College of Music in organ performance. A past master of math and fund-raising, he's currently master of musicat Epiphany Church in Georgetown.

Notes on the Program:

Vaughan Williams, the English music laureate of the 20th century, adored traveling his native land in search of folk melodies that he determinedto be uniquely British, setting them in an unimaginable range of forms.This is the original instrumentation.

Spohr occupies an unusual place in musical history. A consummately skilled violinist, he isn't really "known" for anything he wrote, which is a pity. Most of his life he was Capellmeister in Cassel, which gave him freedomto compose prolifically and concertize regularly. From most accounts, hewas highly conceited and hard to get along with. These are a small samplingof his large output of songs, oratorios, and works for a broad varietyof instruments.

The famous Rachmaninoff vocalise reverses what we instrumentalists generally do - it makes instruments sound like voices.

Beethoven penned this trio, whose majestic slow movement is among his finest confections, in Vienna in 1798. While it's also written for violin, we think it much better with clarinet.

Arnold Cooke, an Englishman, studied composition in Berlin during the 1920s. This sonata, whose emotional core is the slow movement, was commissioned by London's Hampton Music Club in the mid-60s, makes great use of the clarinet's startling rising octaves.

Bruch was a professor at the University of Breslau. Originally these pieces were conceived for piano solo, but when his son showed promise onthe clarinet, he rescored it. The work of a 70-year-old Lutheran writingon the eve of the Jazz Age, they are a romantic throwback to the 19th century,evoking the vanished world of Eastern European Jewry.


The Fortieth Concert

Wednesday, May 10, 2000, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:

Carl Tretter & Nayiri Poochikian, violin

Tom Blackburn, cello

David Ehrlich, piano

The Program:

Serenade by Franz Schubert

Berceuse de Jocelyn by Benjamin Godard

Sonatina in G, op. 100 by Antonin Dvorak

Allegro risoluto - Larghetto - Scherzo. Molto vivace - Finale. Allegro

INTERMISSION

Trio, op. 70a, "Ghost" by Ludwig van Beethoven

Allegro vivace con brio - Largo assai ed espressivo - Presto

Our Artists:

Carl Tretter makes his fifth appearance with SWCMP tonight. A great music lover, Carl enjoys performing on his 1760 Landolfi fiddle in local orchestras and chamber groups and at the Bennington (Vt.) summerchamber workshop. Beginning violin studies at age six, he spent eight summersat the camp in Interlochen. Lawyer/businessman Carl specializes in realestate and investments.

Born in Egypt of Armenian heritage, Nayiri Poochikian studied at the Cairo Conservatory and the Royal Academy of Music in London withManoug Parikian, later finishing at Peabody and Catholic University withRobert Gerle. A SWCMP favorite, she's also performed as a recitalist inNew York's Carnegie Recital Hall and soloed with orchestras in Cairo andLondon.

Cellist Tom Blackburn has done time with the St. Louis Philharmonic and Washington Symphony, as well as his own Hunt Quartet, which did a spectacular show for us a year ago.

Your "impresario" David Ehrlich learned the piano from his father, Richard, in Boston, starting at the age of six. Since learning (at theage of seven) that he wasn't destined to be Horowitz, he's resigned himselfto a life of musical amateurship, studying with Marilyn Neeley and playingfor charities and friends, in venues as diverse as Eugene, Oregon; Tiburon,California; N.Y. City; and Nagydorog, Hungary.

Notes on the Program:

Both the two major works on tonight's program are nineteenth-century standards. Dvorak, a frequent visitor to the United States, was much taken with what he considered the New World. Not only the famous symphony ofthat name, but many other works, including this little sonatina which hewrote for his children, were the products of his roaming our world. Thefive-note melody of the second movement is said to be his rendering of"Minnehaha Falls" in Minnesota.

Beethoven's "Ghost" Trio is among the revered masterpieces of the repertoire. The sobriquet comes from the unmistakably ghostly quality of the middlemovement, with its soft, floating sotto voce passages interrupted by crashing footfalls. The rushing passagework of the two outer movements goes like the wind, one faster than the other, but the challenge to the performersis not just how fast they can play it, but how clearly, because the melodic content is so wonderful.


The Thirty-Ninth Concert

Wednesday, April 5, 2000, 7:30 p.m.

Celebrating the Cherry Blossoms

Featuring:

Rosemarie Ruiz Houghton, soprano

Carl Blackwell, flute

Wendy Hodge, oboe

Jerry Schwarz, clarinet

Susan Wilson, bassoon

David Ehrlich, piano

The Program:

Works by Bichteler, Schubert, Saint-Saens and Weber